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Formal thought disorder in people at ultra-high risk of psychosis

  • Arsime Demjaha (a1), Sara Weinstein (a2), Daniel Stahl (a3), Fern Day (a1), Lucia Valmaggia (a1), Grazia Rutigliano (a4), Andrea De Micheli (a5), Paolo Fusar-Poli (a1) and Philip McGuire (a1)...
Abstract
Background

Formal thought disorder is a cardinal feature of psychosis. However, the extent to which formal thought disorder is evident in ultra-high-risk individuals and whether it is linked to the progression to psychosis remains unclear.

Aims

Examine the severity of formal thought disorder in ultra-high-risk participants and its association with future psychosis.

Method

The Thought and Language Index (TLI) was used to assess 24 ultra-high-risk participants, 16 people with first-episode psychosis and 13 healthy controls. Ultra-high-risk individuals were followed up for a mean duration of 7 years (s.d.=1.5) to determine the relationship between formal thought disorder at baseline and transition to psychosis.

Results

TLI scores were significantly greater in the ultra-high-risk group compared with the healthy control group (effect size (ES)=1.2), but lower than in people with first-episode psychosis (ES=0.8). Total and negative TLI scores were higher in ultra-high-risk individuals who developed psychosis, but this was not significant. Combining negative TLI scores with attenuated psychotic symptoms and basic symptoms predicted transition to psychosis (P=0.04; ES=1.04).

Conclusions

TLI is beneficial in evaluating formal thought disorder in ultra-high-risk participants, and complements existing instruments for the evaluation of psychopathology in this group.

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Copyright
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Arsime Demjaha, Department of Psychosis Studies, Biomedical Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, 16 De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. E-mail: arsime.demjaha@kcl.ac.uk
Footnotes
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Declaration of interests

None.

Footnotes
References
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Formal thought disorder in people at ultra-high risk of psychosis

  • Arsime Demjaha (a1), Sara Weinstein (a2), Daniel Stahl (a3), Fern Day (a1), Lucia Valmaggia (a1), Grazia Rutigliano (a4), Andrea De Micheli (a5), Paolo Fusar-Poli (a1) and Philip McGuire (a1)...
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