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Health screening, cardiometabolic disease and adverse health outcomes in individuals with severe mental illness

  • Robert Pearsall (a1), Richard J. Shaw (a2), Gary McLean (a2), Moira Connolly (a3), Kate A. Hughes (a4), James G. Boyle (a5), John Park (a6), Daniel J. Smith (a7) and Daniel Mackay (a8)...

Abstract

Background

Poor physical health in severe mental illness (SMI) remains a major issue for clinical practice.

Aims

To use electronic health records of routinely collected clinical data to determine levels of screening for cardiometabolic disease and adverse health outcomes in a large sample (n = 7718) of patients with SMI, predominantly schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Method

We linked data from the Glasgow Psychosis Clinical Information System (PsyCIS) to morbidity records, routine blood results and prescribing data.

Results

There was no record of routine blood monitoring during the preceding 2 years for 16.9% of the cohort. However, monitoring was poorer for male patients, younger patients aged 16–44, those with schizophrenia, and for tests of cholesterol, triglyceride and glycosylated haemoglobin. We estimated that 8.0% of participants had diabetes and that lipids levels, and use of lipid-lowering medication, was generally high.

Conclusions

Electronic record linkage identified poor health screening and adverse health outcomes in this vulnerable patient group. This approach can inform the design of future interventions and health policy.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Robert Pearsall, Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK. Email: robert.pearsall@nhs.net

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest: None.

*

These authors contributed equally to this work.

Footnotes

References

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Health screening, cardiometabolic disease and adverse health outcomes in individuals with severe mental illness

  • Robert Pearsall (a1), Richard J. Shaw (a2), Gary McLean (a2), Moira Connolly (a3), Kate A. Hughes (a4), James G. Boyle (a5), John Park (a6), Daniel J. Smith (a7) and Daniel Mackay (a8)...

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Health screening, cardiometabolic disease and adverse health outcomes in individuals with severe mental illness

  • Robert Pearsall (a1), Richard J. Shaw (a2), Gary McLean (a2), Moira Connolly (a3), Kate A. Hughes (a4), James G. Boyle (a5), John Park (a6), Daniel J. Smith (a7) and Daniel Mackay (a8)...
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