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Individual differences in schizophrenia

  • Edmund T. Rolls (a1), Wenlian Lu (a2), Lin Wan (a3), Hao Yan (a4), Chuanyue Wang (a5), Fude Yang (a6), Yunlong Tan (a6), Lingjiang Li (a7), Chinese Schizophrenia Collaboration Group, Hao Yu (a4), Peter F. Liddle (a8), Lena Palaniyappan (a9), Dai Zhang (a10), Weihua Yue (a4) and Jianfeng Feng (a11)...
Abstract
Background

Whether there are distinct subtypes of schizophrenia is an important issue to advance understanding and treatment of schizophrenia.

Aims

To understand and treat individuals with schizophrenia, the aim was to advance understanding of differences between individuals, whether there are discrete subtypes, and how fist-episode patients (FEP) may differ from multiple episode patients (MEP).

Method

These issues were analysed in 687 FEP and 1880 MEP with schizophrenia using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for (PANSS) schizophrenia before and after antipsychotic medication for 6 weeks.

Results

The seven Negative Symptoms were correlated with each other and with P2 (conceptual disorganisation), G13 (disturbance of volition), and G7 (motor retardation). The main difference between individuals was in the cluster of seven negative symptoms, which had a continuous unimodal distribution. Medication decreased the PANSS scores for all the symptoms, which were similar in the FEP and MEP groups.

Conclusions

The negative symptoms are a major source of individual differences, and there are potential implications for treatment.

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Copyright
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Corresponding author
Jianfeng Feng, Centre for Computational Systems Biology, School of Mathematical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; Department of Computer Science, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK. E-mail: jianfeng64@gmail.com
Professor Weihua Yue, The Sixth Hospital, Peking University, Beijing, 100191, China. Email: dryue@bjmu.edu.cn
Edmund Rolls, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK. Email: Edmund.Rolls@warwick.ac.uk.
Footnotes
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Declaration of interests

L.P. received speaker fees from Otsuka Canada and educational grant from Janssen Canada in 2017.

Footnotes
References
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Individual differences in schizophrenia

  • Edmund T. Rolls (a1), Wenlian Lu (a2), Lin Wan (a3), Hao Yan (a4), Chuanyue Wang (a5), Fude Yang (a6), Yunlong Tan (a6), Lingjiang Li (a7), Chinese Schizophrenia Collaboration Group, Hao Yu (a4), Peter F. Liddle (a8), Lena Palaniyappan (a9), Dai Zhang (a10), Weihua Yue (a4) and Jianfeng Feng (a11)...
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