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Individuals' experiences of involuntary admissions and preserving control: qualitative study

  • David McGuinness (a1), Kathy Murphy (a2), Emma Bainbridge (a3), Liz Brosnan (a4), Mary Keys (a5), Heike Felzmann (a6), Brian Hallahan (a7), Colm McDonald (a8) and Agnes Higgins (a9)...
Abstract
Background

A theoretical model of individuals' experiences before, during and after involuntary admission has not yet been established.

Aims

To develop an understanding of individuals' experiences over the course of the involuntary admission process.

Method

Fifty individuals were recruited through purposive and theoretical sampling and interviewed 3 months after their involuntary admission. Analyses were conducted using a Straussian grounded theory approach.

Results

The ‘theory of preserving control’ (ToPC) emerged from individuals' accounts of how they adapted to the experience of involuntary admission. The ToPC explains how individuals manage to reclaim control over their emotional, personal and social lives and consists of three categories: ‘losing control’, ‘regaining control’ and ‘maintaining control’, and a number of related subcategories.

Conclusions

Involuntary admission triggers a multifaceted process of control preservation. Clinicians need to develop therapeutic approaches that enable individuals to regain and maintain control over the course of their involuntary admission.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Professor Agnes Higgins, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, 24 D'Olier Street, Dublin D02 T283, Ireland. Email: ahiggins@tcd.ie
References
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Individuals' experiences of involuntary admissions and preserving control: qualitative study

  • David McGuinness (a1), Kathy Murphy (a2), Emma Bainbridge (a3), Liz Brosnan (a4), Mary Keys (a5), Heike Felzmann (a6), Brian Hallahan (a7), Colm McDonald (a8) and Agnes Higgins (a9)...
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