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Meeting the mental health needs of low- and middle-income countries: the start of a long journey

  • Steve Kisely (a1) and Dan Siskind (a2)

Abstract

Summary

Mental health is increasingly recognised as an important component of global health. In recognition of this fact, the European Union funded the Emerald programme (Emerging Mental Health Systems in Low- and Middle-Income Countries). The aims were to improve mental health in the following six low- and middle-income countries (LMICs): Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda. The Emerald programme offers valuable insights into addressing the mental health needs of LMICs. It provides a framework and practical tools. However, it will be important to evaluate longer-term effects including improvements in mental health outcomes, as well as the applicability to LMICs beyond existing participant countries. Importantly, this must be coupled with efforts to improve health worker retention in LMICs.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the same Creative Commons licence is included and the original work is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Steve Kisely. Email: s.kisely@uq.edu.au

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest: None.

Footnotes

References

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Meeting the mental health needs of low- and middle-income countries: the start of a long journey

  • Steve Kisely (a1) and Dan Siskind (a2)

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Meeting the mental health needs of low- and middle-income countries: the start of a long journey

  • Steve Kisely (a1) and Dan Siskind (a2)
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