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Mental health presentations to acute psychiatric services: 3-year study of prevalence and readmission risk for personality disorders compared with psychotic, affective, substance or other disorders

  • Kate L. Lewis (a1), Mahnaz Fanaian (a2), Beth Kotze (a3) and Brin F. S. Grenyer (a4)
Abstract
Background

The relative burden and risk of readmission for people with personality disorders in hospital settings is unknown.

Aims

To compare hospital use of people with personality disorder with that of people with other mental health diagnoses, such as psychoses and affective disorders.

Method

Naturalistic study of hospital presentations for mental health in a large community catchment. Mixed-effects Cox regression and survival curves were generated to examine risk of readmission for each group.

Results

Of 2894 people presenting to hospital, patients with personality disorder represented 20.5% of emergency and 26.6% of in-patients. Patients with personality disorder or psychoses were 2.3 times (95% CI 1.79–2.99) more likely than others to re-present within 28 days. Personality disorder diagnosis increases rate of readmission by a factor of 8.7 (s.e. = 0.31), marginally lower than psychotic disorders (10.02, s.e. = 0.31).

Conclusions

Personality disorders place significant demands on in-patient and emergency departments, similar to that of psychoses in terms of presentation and risk of readmission.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Brin F. S. Grenyer, School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia2522. Email: grenyer@uow.edu.au
References
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Mental health presentations to acute psychiatric services: 3-year study of prevalence and readmission risk for personality disorders compared with psychotic, affective, substance or other disorders

  • Kate L. Lewis (a1), Mahnaz Fanaian (a2), Beth Kotze (a3) and Brin F. S. Grenyer (a4)
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