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Mental health professionals' knowledge, skills and attitudes on domestic violence and abuse in the Netherlands: cross-sectional study

  • Roos E. Ruijne (a1), Astrid M. Kamperman (a2), Kylee Trevillion (a3), Carlo Garofalo (a4), Femke E. Jongejan (a5), Stefan Bogaerts (a6), Louise M. Howard (a7) and Niels L. Mulder (a8)...
Abstract
Background

Despite the high prevalence of domestic violence and abuse (DVA) among patients with psychiatric conditions, detection rates are low. Limited knowledge and skills on DVA in mental healthcare (MHC) professionals might contribute to poor identification.

Aims

To assess the level of, and factors associated with, DVA knowledge and skills among MHC professionals.

Method

A total of 278 professionals in Dutch MHC institutions completed a survey assessing factual knowledge, perceived knowledge, perceived skills and attitudes about DVA.

Results

On average, low scores were reported for perceived skills and knowledge. MHC professionals in primary care scored higher than those working with individuals with severe mental illness (P<0.005). Levels of factual knowledge were higher; levels of attitudes moderate. Previous training was positively associated with skills (odds ratios (OR) = 3.0) and attitudes (OR = 2.7). Years of work was negatively associated with factual knowledge (OR = 0.97). Larger case-loads predicted higher scores on skills (OR = 2.1).

Conclusions

Training is needed, particularly for clinicians working with patients with severe mental illness.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Roos E. Ruijne, Epidemiological and Social Psychiatric Research Institute, Department of Psychiatry, Erasmus University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Dr. Molenwaterplein 40, 3015 GD Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Email: r.ruijne@erasmusmc.nl
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Mental health professionals' knowledge, skills and attitudes on domestic violence and abuse in the Netherlands: cross-sectional study

  • Roos E. Ruijne (a1), Astrid M. Kamperman (a2), Kylee Trevillion (a3), Carlo Garofalo (a4), Femke E. Jongejan (a5), Stefan Bogaerts (a6), Louise M. Howard (a7) and Niels L. Mulder (a8)...
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