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Perspectives of patients, carers and mental health staff on early warning signs of relapse in psychosis: a qualitative investigation

  • Stephanie Allan (a1), Simon Bradstreet (a2), Hamish J. McLeod (a3), John Gleeson (a4), John Farhall (a5), Maria Lambrou (a6), Andrea Clark (a7) and Andrew I. Gumley (a3)...

Abstract

Background

Relapse prevention strategies based on monitoring of early warning signs (EWS) are advocated for the management of psychosis. However, there has been a lack of research exploring how staff, carers and patients make sense of the utility of EWS, or how these are implemented in context.

Aims

To develop a multiperspective theory of how EWS are understood and used, which is grounded in the experiences of mental health staff, carers and patients.

Method

Twenty-five focus groups were held across Glasgow and Melbourne (EMPOWER Trial, ISRCTN: 99559262). Participants comprised 88 mental health staff, 21 patients and 40 carers from UK and Australia (total n = 149). Data were analysed using constructivist grounded theory.

Results

All participants appeared to recognise EWS and acknowledged the importance of responding to EWS to support relapse prevention. However, recognition of and acting on EWS were constructed in a context of uncertainty, which appeared linked to risk appraisals that were dependent on distinct stakeholder roles and experiences. Within current relapse management, a process of weighted decision-making (where one factor was seen as more important than others) described how stakeholders weighed up the risks and consequences of relapse alongside the risks and consequences of intervention and help-seeking.

Conclusions

Mental health staff, carers and patients speak about using EWS within a weighted decision-making process, which is acted out in the context of relationships that exist in current relapse management, rather than an objective response to specific signs and symptoms.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Andrew I. Gumley. Email: andrew.gumley@glasgow.ac.uk

Footnotes

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See the Acknowledgements for members of the research group.

Footnotes

References

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Keywords

Perspectives of patients, carers and mental health staff on early warning signs of relapse in psychosis: a qualitative investigation

  • Stephanie Allan (a1), Simon Bradstreet (a2), Hamish J. McLeod (a3), John Gleeson (a4), John Farhall (a5), Maria Lambrou (a6), Andrea Clark (a7) and Andrew I. Gumley (a3)...

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Perspectives of patients, carers and mental health staff on early warning signs of relapse in psychosis: a qualitative investigation

  • Stephanie Allan (a1), Simon Bradstreet (a2), Hamish J. McLeod (a3), John Gleeson (a4), John Farhall (a5), Maria Lambrou (a6), Andrea Clark (a7) and Andrew I. Gumley (a3)...
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