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Predictive factors for hyperglycaemic progression in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

  • Ichiro Kusumi (a1), Yuki Arai (a2), Ryo Okubo (a3), Minoru Honda (a4), Yasuhiro Matsuda (a5), Yukihiko Matsuda (a6), Akihiko Tochigi (a7), Yoshiteru Takekita (a8), Hiroyoshi Yamanaka (a9), Keiichi Uemura (a10), Koichi Ito (a11), Kiyoshi Tsuchiya (a12), Jun Yamada (a13), Bunta Yoshimura (a14), Nobuyuki Mitsui (a15), Sigehiro Matsubara (a16), Takayuki Segawa (a9), Nobuyuki Nishi (a17), Yasufumi Sugawara (a18), Yuki Kako (a19), Ikuta Shinkawa (a14), Kaoru Shinohara (a20), Akiko Konishi (a14), Junichi Iga (a21), Naoki Hashimoto (a22), Shinsaku Inomata (a23), Noriko Tsukamoto (a24), Hiroto Ito (a25), Yoichi M. Ito (a26) and Norihiro Sato (a27)...
Abstract
Background

Patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder have a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Aims

To identify predictive factors for hyperglycaemic progression in individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and to determine whether hyperglycaemic progression rates differ among antipsychotics in regular clinical practice.

Method

We recruited 1166 patients who initially had normal or prediabetic glucose levels for a nationwide, multisite, l-year prospective cohort study to determine predictive factors for hyperglycaemic progression. We also examined whether hyperglycaemic progression varied among patients receiving monotherapy with the six most frequently used antipsychotics.

Results

High baseline serum triglycerides and coexisting hypertension significantly predicted hyperglycaemic progression. The six most frequently used antipsychotics did not significantly differ in their associated hyperglycaemic progression rates over the 1-year observation period.

Conclusions

Clinicians should carefully evaluate baseline serum triglycerides and coexisting hypertension and perform strict longitudinal monitoring irrespective of the antipsychotic used.

Declaration of interest

The authors report no financial or other relationship that is relevant to the subject of this article. Relevant financial activities outside the submitted work are as follows. I.K. has received honoraria from Astellas, Chugai Pharmaceutical, Daiichi Sankyo, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma, Eisai, Eli Lilly, Janssen Pharmaceutical, Kyowa Hakko Kirin, Meiji Seika Pharma, MSD, Nippon Chemiphar, Novartis Pharma, Ono Pharmaceutical, Otsuka Pharmaceutical, Pfizer, Tanabe Mitsubishi Pharma, Shionogi and Yoshitomiyakuhin; has received research/grant support from AbbVie GK, Asahi Kasei Pharma, Astellas, Boehringer Ingelheim, Chugai Pharmaceutical, Daiichi Sankyo, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma, Eisai, Eli Lilly, GlaxoSmithKline, Kyowa Hakko Kirin, Meiji Seika Pharma, MSD, Novartis Pharma, Ono Pharmaceutical, Otsuka Pharmaceutical, Pfizer, Takeda Pharmaceutical, Tanabe Mitsubishi Pharma, Shionogi and Yoshitomiyakuhin; and is a member of the advisory boards of Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma and Tanabe Mitsubishi Pharma. Y.T. has received speaker's honoraria from Dainippon-Sumitomo Pharma, Otsuka, Meiji-Seika Pharma, Janssen Pharmaceutical, Daiichi-Sankyo Company, UCB Japan and Ono Pharmaceutical. K.U. has received honoraria from Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma, Eisai, Eli Lilly, Janssen Pharmaceutical, Kyowa Hakko Kirin, Meiji Seika Pharma, MSD, Takeda Pharmaceutical, Hisamitsu Pharmaceutical, Otsuka Pharmaceutical, Pfizer, Tanabe Mitsubishi Pharma, Shionogi and Yoshitomiyakuhin. B.Y. has received speaker's honoraria from Otsuka Pharmaceutical and Janssen Pharmaceutical. J. I. has received honoraria from Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma, Eli Lilly, Janssen Pharmaceutical, Meiji Seika Pharma, MSD, Novartis Pharma, Otsuka Pharmaceutical and Mochida Pharma.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Ichiro Kusumi MD, PhD, North 15, West 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638, Japan. Email: ikusumi@med.hokudai.ac.jp
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Predictive factors for hyperglycaemic progression in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

  • Ichiro Kusumi (a1), Yuki Arai (a2), Ryo Okubo (a3), Minoru Honda (a4), Yasuhiro Matsuda (a5), Yukihiko Matsuda (a6), Akihiko Tochigi (a7), Yoshiteru Takekita (a8), Hiroyoshi Yamanaka (a9), Keiichi Uemura (a10), Koichi Ito (a11), Kiyoshi Tsuchiya (a12), Jun Yamada (a13), Bunta Yoshimura (a14), Nobuyuki Mitsui (a15), Sigehiro Matsubara (a16), Takayuki Segawa (a9), Nobuyuki Nishi (a17), Yasufumi Sugawara (a18), Yuki Kako (a19), Ikuta Shinkawa (a14), Kaoru Shinohara (a20), Akiko Konishi (a14), Junichi Iga (a21), Naoki Hashimoto (a22), Shinsaku Inomata (a23), Noriko Tsukamoto (a24), Hiroto Ito (a25), Yoichi M. Ito (a26) and Norihiro Sato (a27)...
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