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A preliminary survey on the religious profile of Brazilian psychiatrists and their approach to patients' religiosity in clinical practice

  • Maria Cecilia Menegatti-Chequini (a1), Juliane P.B. Gonçalves (a2), Frederico C. Leão (a2), Mario F. P. Peres (a3) and Homero Vallada (a1)...
Abstract
Background

Although there is evidence of a relationship between religion/ spirituality and mental health, it remains unclear how Brazilian psychiatrists deal with the religion/spirituality of their patients.

Aims

To explore whether Brazilian psychiatrists enquire about religion/spirituality in their practice and whether their own beliefs influence their work.

Method

Four hundred and eighty-four Brazilian psychiatrists completed a cross-sectional survey on religion/spirituality and clinical practice.

Results

Most psychiatrists had a religious affiliation (67.4%) but more than half of the 484 participants (55.5%) did not usually enquire about patients' religion/spirituality. The most common reasons for not assessing patients' religion/spirituality were ‘being afraid of exceeding the role of a doctor’ (30.2%) and ‘lack of training’ (22.3%).

Conclusions

Very religious/spiritual psychiatrists were the most likely to ask about their patients' religion/spirituality. Training in how to deal with a patient's religiosity might help psychiatrists to develop better patient rapport and may contribute to the patient's quicker recovery.

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Copyright
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Corresponding author
Maria Cecilia Menegatti-Chequini, Department & Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo Medical School, Rua Dr. Ovídio Pires de Campos, 785, Zip Code 05403-010, São Paulo, Brazil (LIM23). Email: mcmchequini@gmail.com
Footnotes
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These authors share last authorship and have contributed equally to this work.

Declaration of interest

None

Footnotes
References
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A preliminary survey on the religious profile of Brazilian psychiatrists and their approach to patients' religiosity in clinical practice

  • Maria Cecilia Menegatti-Chequini (a1), Juliane P.B. Gonçalves (a2), Frederico C. Leão (a2), Mario F. P. Peres (a3) and Homero Vallada (a1)...
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