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The Problem Behaviour Checklist: short scale to assess challenging behaviours

  • Peter Tyrer (a1), Jessica Nagar (a2), Rosie Evans (a3), Patricia Oliver (a1), Paul Bassett (a4), Natalie Liedtka (a5) and Aris Tarabi (a1)...
Abstract
Background

Challenging behaviour, especially in intellectual disability, covers a wide range that is in need of further evaluation.

Aims

To develop a short but comprehensive instrument for all aspects of challenging behaviour.

Method

In the first part of a two-stage enquiry, a 28-item scale was constructed to examine the components of challenging behaviour. Following a simple factor analysis this was developed further to create a new short scale, the Problem Behaviour Checklist (PBCL). The scale was subsequently used in a randomised controlled trial and tested for interrater reliability. Scores were also compared with a standard scale, the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS).

Results

Seven identified factors – personal violence, violence against property, self-harm, sexually inappropriate, contrary, demanding and disappearing behaviour – were scored on a 5-point scale. A subsequent factor analysis with the second population showed demanding, violent and contrary behaviour to account for most of the variance. Interrater reliability using weighted kappa showed good agreement (0.91; 95% CI 0.83–0.99). Good agreement was also shown with scores on the MOAS and a score of 1 on the PBCL showed high sensitivity (97%) and specificity (85%) for a threshold MOASscore of 4.

Conclusions

The PBCL appears to be a suitable and practical scale for assessing all aspects of challenging behaviour.

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Copyright
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Corresponding author
Peter Tyrer, Centre for Mental Health, Imperial College London, 7th Floor, Commonwealth Building, Hammersmith Hospital, London W12 0NN, UK. Email: p.tyrer@imperial.ac.uk
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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The Problem Behaviour Checklist: short scale to assess challenging behaviours

  • Peter Tyrer (a1), Jessica Nagar (a2), Rosie Evans (a3), Patricia Oliver (a1), Paul Bassett (a4), Natalie Liedtka (a5) and Aris Tarabi (a1)...
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