Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Qualitative exploration of the effect of a television soap opera storyline on women with experience of postpartum psychosis

  • Lewis Roberts (a1), Giles Berrisford (a2), Jessica Heron (a3), Lisa Jones (a4), Ian Jones (a5), Clare Dolman (a6) and Deirdre A. Lane (a7)...
Abstract
Background

Postpartum psychosis has recently been the focus of an in-depth storyline on a British television soap opera watched by millions of viewers.

Aims

This research explored how the storyline and concomitant increase in public awareness of postpartum psychosis have been received by women who have recovered from the condition.

Method

Nine semistructured, one-to-one interviews were conducted with women who had experienced postpartum psychosis. Thematic analysis consistent with Braun and Clarke's six-step approach was used to generate themes from the data.

Results

Public exposure provided by the postpartum psychosis portrayal was deemed highly valuable, and its mixed reception encompassed potentially therapeutic benefits in addition to harms.

Conclusions

Public awareness of postpartum psychosis strongly affects women who have experienced postpartum psychosis. This research highlights the complexity of using television drama for public education and may enable mental health organisations to better focus future practices of raising postpartum psychosis awareness.

Declaration of interest

GB is chair of action on Postpartum Psychosis. JH is director of action on Postpartum Psychosis. IJ is a trustee of action on Postpartum Psychosis and was a consultant to the BBC (television company) on the EastEnders storyline. CD is a trustee of action on Postpartum Psychosis, a trustee of BIPOLAR UK, vice chair of the Maternal Mental Health Alliance, and was a consultant to the BBC (television company) on the EastEnders storyline.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Qualitative exploration of the effect of a television soap opera storyline on women with experience of postpartum psychosis
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Qualitative exploration of the effect of a television soap opera storyline on women with experience of postpartum psychosis
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Qualitative exploration of the effect of a television soap opera storyline on women with experience of postpartum psychosis
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Deidre Lane, PhD, University of Birmingham Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, City Hospital, Dudley Road, Birmingham B18 7QH. deirdrelane@nhs.net
References
Hide All
1 Centre for Maternal and Child Enquiries (CMACE). Saving Mothers’ Lives: reviewing maternal deaths to make motherhood safer: 2006–08. The Eighth Report on Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom. Br J Obstet Gynaecol 2011; 118(suppl 1): 1203.
2 Kendell, RE, Chalmers, JC, Platz, C. Epidemiology of puerperal psychoses. Br J Psychiatry 1987; 150: 662–73.
3 Jones, I, Chandra, PS, Dazzan, P, Howard, LM. Bipolar disorder, affective psychosis, and schizophrenia in pregnancy and the post-partum period. Lancet 2014; 384: 1789–99.
4 Di Florio, A, Smith, S, Jones, I. Postpartum psychosis. The Obstetrician and Gynaecologist 2013; 15: 145–50.
5 Berrisford, G, Lambert, A, Heron, J. Understanding postpartum psychosis. Community Pract 2015; 88: 22.
6 Doucet, S, Letourneau, N, Blackmore, E. Support needs of mothers who experience postpartum psychosis and their partners. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs 2012; 41: 236–45.
7 Edwards, E, Timmons, S. A qualitative study of stigma among women suffering postnatal illness. J Ment Health 2005; 14: 471–81.
8 Engqvist, I, Nilsson, K. Experiences of the first days of postpartum psychosis: an interview study with women and next of kin in Sweden. Issues Ment Health Nurs 2013; 34: 82–9.
9 Glover, L, Jomeen, J, Urquhart, T, Martin, C. Puerperal psychosis – a qualitative study of women's experiences. J Reprod Infant Psychol 2014; 32: 254–69.
10 Heron, J, Gilbert, N, Dolman, C, Shah, S, Beare, I, Dearden, S, et al. Information and support needs during recovery from postpartum psychosis. Arch Womens Ment Health 2012; 15: 155–65.
11 McGrath, L, Peters, S, Wieck, A, Wittkowski, A. The process of recovery in women who experienced psychosis following childbirth. BMC Psychiatry 2013; 13: 341.
12 Robertson, E, Lyons, A. Living with puerperal psychosis: a qualitative analysis. Psychol Psychother 2003; 76: 411–31.
13 Wyatt, C, Murray, C, Davies, J, Jomeen, J. Postpartum psychosis and relationships: their mutual influence from the perspective of women and significant others. J Reprod Infant Psychol 2015; 33: 426–42.
14 Broadcasters Audience Research Board. Weekly Top 30 Programmes. BARB, 2016 (http://www.barb.co.uk/viewing-data/weekly-top-30/).
15 Action on Postpartum Psychosis. About Us. The UK Postpartum Psychosis Network, 2016 (http://www.app-network.org/about-us/).
16 Phillips, D. The werther effect. Sciences 1985; 25: 3240.
17 Hawton, K, Simkin, S, Deeks, J, O'Connor, S, Keen, A, Altman, D, et al. Effects of a drug overdose in a television drama on presentations to hospital for self-poisoning: time series and questionnaire study. BMJ 1999; 318: 972–7.
18 Ayers, J, Althouse, B, Leas, E, Dredze, M, Allem, J. Internet searches for suicide following the release of 13 reasons why. JAMA Intern Med 2017; 177: 1527–9.
19 Pirkis, J, Blood, R, Francis, C, McCallum, K. On-screen portrayals of mental illness: extent, nature, and impacts. J Health Commun 2006; 11: 523–41.
20 Stuart, H. Media portrayal of mental illness and its treatments. CNS Drugs 2006; 20: 99106.
21 Bhaskar, R. A Realist Theory of Science. Taylor & Francis, 2008.
22 Laforest, J. Guide to Organising Semi-Structured Interviews with Key Informant. Institut national de santé publique, 2009 (http://www.crpspc.qc.ca/Guide_entretien_versionWEB_eng.pdf).
23 Braun, V, Clarke, V. Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qual Res Psychol 2006; 3: 77101.
24 Guba, E, Lincoln, Y. Effective Evaluation: Improving the Usefulness of Evaluation Results Through Responsive and Naturalistic Approaches. Jossey-Bass, 1981.
25 Lincoln, Y, Guba, E. Naturalistic Inquiry. Sage, 1985.
26 Livingstone, S. Television and the active audience. In Formations: A 21st Century Media Studies Textbook (ed Fleming, D): 175199. Manchester University Press, 2000.
27 O'Brien, K, Knight, J, Harris, S. A call for social responsibility and suicide risk screening, prevention, and early intervention following the release of the netflix series 13 reasons why. JAMA Intern Med 2017; 177: 1418–9.
28 Berg-Cross, L, Jennings, P, Baruch, R. Cinematherapy: theory and application. Psychother Priv Pract 1990; 8: 135–56.
29 Ballard, M. The family life cycle and critical transitions: utilizing cinematherapy to facilitate understanding and increase communication. J Creativity Ment Health 2012; 7: 141–52.
30 Dermer, S, Hutchings, J. Utilizing movies in family therapy: applications for individuals, couples, and families. Am J Fam Ther 2000; 28: 163–80.
31 Sharp, C, Smith, J, Cole, A. Cinematherapy: metaphorically promoting therapeutic change. Couns Psychol Q 2002; 15: 269–76.
32 Davison, W. The third-person effect in communication. Public Opin Q 1983; 47: 1.
33 Modestin, J, Soult, J, Malti, T. Correlates of coping styles in psychotic illness. Psychopathology 2004; 37: 175–80.
34 McGlashan, T. Recovery style from mental illness and long-term outcome. J Nerv Ment Dis 1987; 175: 681–5.
35 Green, J. Qualitative methods. Community Eye Health 1999; 12: 46–7.
36 Guest, G. How many interviews are enough?: an experiment with data saturation and variability. Field Methods 2006; 18: 5982.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Open
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 2056-4724
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-open
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 62
Total number of PDF views: 150 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 635 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 19th March 2018 - 16th August 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Qualitative exploration of the effect of a television soap opera storyline on women with experience of postpartum psychosis

  • Lewis Roberts (a1), Giles Berrisford (a2), Jessica Heron (a3), Lisa Jones (a4), Ian Jones (a5), Clare Dolman (a6) and Deirdre A. Lane (a7)...
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *