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Serotonin transporter polymorphism (5HTTLPR), severe childhood abuse and depressive symptom trajectories in adulthood

  • Timothy B. Nguyen (a1), Jane M. Gunn (a2), Maria Potiriadis (a2), Ian P. Everall (a3) and Chad A. Bousman (a4)...
Abstract
Background

Cross-sectional studies suggest that the serotonin transporter promoter region polymorphism (5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region, 5HTTLPR) moderates the relationship between childhood abuse and major depressive disorder.

Aims

To examine whether the 5HTTLPR polymorphism moderates the effect childhood abuse has on 5-year depressive symptom severity trajectories in adulthood.

Method

At 5-year follow-up, DNA from 333 adult primary care attendees was obtained and genotyped for the 5HTTLPR polymorphism. Linear mixed models were used to test for a genotype × childhood abuse interaction effect on 5-year depressive symptom severity trajectories.

Results

After covariate adjustment, homozygous s allele carriers with a history of severe childhood abuse had significantly greater depressive symptom severity at baseline compared with those without a history of severe childhood abuse and this effect persisted throughout the 5-year period of observation.

Conclusions

The 5HTTLPR s/s genotype robustly moderates the effects of severe childhood abuse on depressive symptom severity trajectories in adulthood.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Dr Chad Bousman, Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, 161 Barry Street, Level 3, Carlton, VIC 3053, Australia. Email: cbousman@unimelb.edu.au
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Serotonin transporter polymorphism (5HTTLPR), severe childhood abuse and depressive symptom trajectories in adulthood

  • Timothy B. Nguyen (a1), Jane M. Gunn (a2), Maria Potiriadis (a2), Ian P. Everall (a3) and Chad A. Bousman (a4)...
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