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The use of social environment in a psychosocial clubhouse to facilitate recovery-oriented practice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Toby Raeburn*
Affiliation:
School of Nursing & Midwifery, Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Virginia Schmied
Affiliation:
School of Nursing, Midwifery, and Indigenous Health, Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW, Australia
Catherine Hungerford
Affiliation:
School of Health Sciences, University of Tasmania, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Michelle Cleary
Affiliation:
School of Health Sciences, University of Tasmania, Sydney, NSW, Australia
*
Toby Raeburn, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Western Sydney University, Post; 88 Mallet Street, Camperdown NSW 2006, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Email: 16473430@student.uws.edu.au
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Abstract

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Background

Recovery-oriented language has been widely adopted in mental health policy; however, little is known about how recovery practices are implemented within individual services, such as psychosocial clubhouses.

Aims

To explore how recovery practices are implemented in a psychosocial clubhouse.

Method

Qualitative case study design informed by self-determination theory was utilised. This included 120 h of participant observation, interviews with 12 clubhouse members and 6 staff members. Field notes and interview transcripts were subject to theoretical thematic analysis.

Results

Two overarching themes were identified, each comprising three sub-themes. In this paper, the overarching theme of ‘social environment’ is discussed. It was characterised by the sub-themes, ‘community and consistency’, ‘participation and opportunity’ and ‘respect and autonomy’.

Conclusions

Social environment was used to facilitate recovery-oriented practice within the clubhouse. Whether recovery is experienced by clubhouse members in wider society, may well depend on supports and opportunities outside the clubhouse.

Type
Research Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016

Footnotes

Declaration of interest

None.

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