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Use of videotaped personal compulsions to enhance motivation in obsessive–compulsive disorder

  • Johanna A. M. du Mortier (a1), Henny A. D. Visser (a2), Malinda F. R. van Geijtenbeek - de Vos van Steenwijk (a3), Harold J. G. M. van Megen (a1) and Anton J. L. M. van Balkom (a4)...
Abstract
Background

Watching videotaped personal compulsions together with a therapist might enhance the effect of cognitive–behavioural therapy in obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) but little is known about how patients experience this.

Aims

To performed a qualitative study that describes how watching these videos influences motivation for treatment and whether patients report any adverse events.

Method

In this qualitative study, data were gathered in semi-structured interviews with 24 patients with OCD. The transcripts were coded by two researchers. They used a combination of open and thematic coding and discrepancies in coding were discussed.

Results

The experience of watching videos with personal compulsions helped patients to realise that these compulsions are aberrant and irrational. Patients report increased motivation to resist their OCD and to adhere to therapy. No adverse events were reported.

Conclusions

Videos with personal compulsions create more awareness in patients with OCD that compulsions are irrational, leading to enhanced motivation for treatment.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Johanna A. M. du Mortier, GGz Centraal, Innova, Postbus 3051, 3800 DB Amersfoort, the Netherlands. Email: h.vandijk-dumortier@ggzcentraal.nl
References
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Use of videotaped personal compulsions to enhance motivation in obsessive–compulsive disorder

  • Johanna A. M. du Mortier (a1), Henny A. D. Visser (a2), Malinda F. R. van Geijtenbeek - de Vos van Steenwijk (a3), Harold J. G. M. van Megen (a1) and Anton J. L. M. van Balkom (a4)...
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