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Using daily monitoring of psychiatric symptoms to evaluate hospital length of stay

  • Andrew C. Page (a1), Nadia K. Cunningham (a1) and Geoffrey R. Hooke (a2)
Abstract
Background

Routine symptom monitoring and feedback improves out-patient outcomes, but the feasibility of its use to inform decisions about discharge from in-patient care has not been explored.

Aims

To examine the potential value to clinical decision-making of monitoring symptoms during psychiatric in-patient hospitalisation.

Method

A total of 1102 in-patients in a private psychiatric hospital, primarily with affective and neurotic disorders, rated daily distress levels throughout their hospital stay. The trajectories of patients who had, and had not, met a criterion of clinically significant improvement were examined.

Results

Two-thirds of patients (n=604) met the clinically significant improvement criterion at discharge, and three-quarters (n=867) met the criterion earlier during their hospital stay. After meeting the criterion, the majority (73.2%) showed stable symptoms across the remainder of their hospital stay, and both classes showed substantially lower symptoms than at admission.

Conclusions

Monitoring of progress towards this criterion provides additional information regarding significant treatment response that could inform clinical decisions around discharge readiness.

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Copyright
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Corresponding author
Andrew C. Page, School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009, Australia. Email: andrew.page@uwa.edu.au
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Using daily monitoring of psychiatric symptoms to evaluate hospital length of stay

  • Andrew C. Page (a1), Nadia K. Cunningham (a1) and Geoffrey R. Hooke (a2)
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