Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-gctlb Total loading time: 0.201 Render date: 2022-07-01T08:48:39.331Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

What Is the Future of Primary Mental Health Care?: A Post COVID-19 Service Evaluation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 June 2022

Ahmad Zarif
Affiliation:
New Vision University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Imaduldin Nazir
Affiliation:
New Vision University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Azad Mahmod
Affiliation:
New Vision University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Hajira Bibi
Affiliation:
New Vision University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Reshma Rasheed
Affiliation:
Rigg Milner Medical Centre, East Tilbury, United Kingdom
Anjali Patel*
Affiliation:
New Vision University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Yathorshan Shanthakumaran
Affiliation:
Rigg Milner Medical Centre, East Tilbury, United Kingdom
*
*Presenting author.
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.
Aims

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many service lines needed to be transformed to enable more telemedicine and virtual consultations. This enabled seamless care across many service boundaries as all services adapted to operate virtually. During COVID-19, the mental health of many patients deteriorated. With easing of restrictions, we wanted the patient voice to be heard and to ensure our service was patient-centred. We undertook a service evaluation to understand our patients preferences. Our cross-sectional study evaluated patient preferences for their care which we felt was important as earlier during pandemic, patients did not have the choice to choose between virtual vs face-to-face consultations. We felt this was important to our patients so they could exercise choice of consultation and this would enable the patient voice to be heard.

Methods

591 patients across three practices in primary care were identified from the Serious Mental Illness (SMI) and on the depression register. They were asked about their preference of care: telemedicine vs face-to-face consultations. Using a simple questionnaire, in order to record their preference on the patient screen. Of these a total of 495 patients (83%) participated in the study.

Results

Of the 495 respondents, 308 (52%) declined virtual telemedicine consultations and 175 (29%) patients were content with virtual consultations. Of the 175 patients who wanted telemedicine were 20 to 40 years of age. Reasons given included convenience (allows family and work commitment) and overall time management (reluctancy to travel). The 308 patients (52%) wanted face-to-face consultations because they wanted human contact, validation of their mental health problems, reassurance and were uncomfortable about discussions on the phone. They also had poor mobility especially the elderly who chose traditional models of care.

Conclusion

As services are restored to the new norm of patient care, patient choice should remain paramount if services are to remain patient centric. During the COVID-19 pandemic, many services transformed to virtual consultation of necessity without recognising the impact on patients themselves. Patients with serious mental health and depression are inherently vulnerable and our evaluation goes to show that despite the popularity of telemedicine. Patient choice should enable patients to access face-to-face care for greater patient satisfaction.

Type
Service Evaluation
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Royal College of Psychiatrists
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.
You have Access Open access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

What Is the Future of Primary Mental Health Care?: A Post COVID-19 Service Evaluation
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

What Is the Future of Primary Mental Health Care?: A Post COVID-19 Service Evaluation
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

What Is the Future of Primary Mental Health Care?: A Post COVID-19 Service Evaluation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *