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Babysong revisited: communication with babies through song

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 November 2022

Vanessa Young*
Affiliation:
Canterbury Christ Church University
Kathleen Goouch
Affiliation:
Canterbury Christ Church University
Sacha Powell
Affiliation:
The Froebel Trust
*
*Corresponding author. Email: vanessayoung69@aol.com

Abstract

The Babysong Project arose out of the Baby Room Project and its aims included supporting baby room practitioners to develop ‘communicative musicality’ (Malloch & Trevarthen 2009), extending research knowledge about baby room practices and helping practitioners to explore opportunities to question and adapt their own ways of working with babies in their care. Six years on, we reflect on the project and consider the significance and sustainability of what might have been achieved. We also probe whether there are further areas for development. We conclude that while there were many positive outcomes, we recognise the challenges of sustaining and nurturing the confidence of practitioners and the desirability of addressing the organisational aspects of the initiative to promote the embedding of practice. There is a real necessity for such projects, often involving radical challenges to previously held attitudes and practices, to be funded over longer periods of time. We also acknowledge the rich, untapped potential of using song to connect with families and carers.

Type
Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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