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The power of rap in music education: a study of undergraduate students’ original rap creations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 April 2023

Jonathan McElroy*
Affiliation:
New York University, 82 Washington Square E. New York, NY 10003, USA
*

Abstract

An undergraduate music class was examined that incorporated the creation of students’ individual original raps. Research was conducted to understand the value of studying rap and its impact upon students’ education. This instrumental case study utilised students’ individual raps as an art-based research component to address three research questions: 1.) How, if at all, does studying hip-hop through the creation of a rap provide a transformative experience and growth in students? 2.) How are student experiences reflected in the use of music composition through the creation of an original rap? and 3.) How does the process of creating an original rap provide insight into students’ experiences?

Type
Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2023. Published by Cambridge University Press

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