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Higher egg consumption associated with increased risk of diabetes in Chinese adults – China Health and Nutrition Survey

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 October 2020

Yue Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Nutrition, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110001, People’s Republic of China
Ming Li*
Affiliation:
Centre for Population Health Research, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
Zumin Shi*
Affiliation:
Human Nutrition Department, College of Health Sciences, QU Health, Qatar University, Doha 2713, Qatar
*
*Corresponding authors: Dr. Ming Li, email ming.li@unisa.edu.au; Dr Zumin Shi, email zumin@qu.edu.qa
*Corresponding authors: Dr. Ming Li, email ming.li@unisa.edu.au; Dr Zumin Shi, email zumin@qu.edu.qa

Abstract

The association between egg consumption and diabetes is inconclusive. We aimed to examine the association between long-term egg consumption and its trajectory with diabetes in Chinese adults. A total of 8545 adults aged ≥18 years old who attended the China Health and Nutrition Survey from 1991 to 2009 were included in this analysis. Egg consumption at each survey was assessed by a 3-d 24-h recall and weighed food record methods. The consumption trajectories of eggs were modelled with the latent class group approach. Diabetes was diagnosed based on fasting blood glucose in 2009. Logistic regression was used to examine the association. The mean age of the study population was 50·9 (sd 15·1) years. About 11·1 % had diabetes in 2009. Egg consumption nearly doubled in 2009 from 16 g/d in 1991. Compared with the first quartile of egg consumption (0–9·0 g/d), the adjusted OR of diabetes for the second (9·1–20·6 g/d), third (20·7–37·5 g/d) and fourth (≥37·6 g/d) quartiles were 1·29 (95 % CI 1·03, 1·62), 1·37 (95 % CI 1·09, 1·72) and 1·25 (95 % CI 1·04, 1·64), respectively (Pfor trend = 0·029). Three trajectory groups of egg consumption were identified. Compared with group 1 (30·7 %, low baseline intake and slight increase), both group 2 (62·2 %, medium baseline intake and increase) and group 3 (7·1 %, high baseline intake and decrease) were associated with an increased OR for diabetes. The results suggested that higher egg consumption was positively associated with the risk of diabetes in Chinese adults.

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Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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