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Absorption and initial metabolism of 75Se-l-selenomethionine: a kinetic model based on dynamic scintigraphic data

  • Mareile Große Ruse (a1), Lasse R. Søndergaard (a2), Susanne Ditlevsen (a1), Morten Damgaard (a2), Stefan Fuglsang (a2), Johnny T. Ottesen (a3) and Jan L. Madsen (a2)...
Abstract

Selenomethionine (SeMet) is an important organic nutritional source of Se, but the uptake and metabolism of SeMet are poorly characterised in humans. Dynamic gamma camera images of the abdominal region were acquired from eight healthy young men after the ingestion of radioactive 75Se-l-SeMet (75Se-SeMet). Scanning started simultaneously to the ingestion of 75Se-SeMet and lasted 120 min. We generated time-activity curves from two-dimensional regions of interest in the stomach, small intestine and liver. During scanning, blood samples were collected at 10-min intervals to generate plasma time-activity curves. A four-compartment model, augmented with a delay between the liver and plasma, was fitted to individual participants’ data. The mean rate constant for 75Se-SeMet transport was 2·63 h–1 from the stomach to the small intestine, 13·2 h–1 from the small intestine to the liver, 0·261 h–1 from the liver to the plasma and 0·267 h–1 from the stomach to the plasma. The delay in the liver was 0·714 h. Gamma camera imaging provides data for use in compartmental modelling of 75Se-SeMet absorption and metabolism in humans. In clinical settings, the obtained rate constants and the delay in the liver may be useful variables for quantifying reduced intestinal absorption capacity or liver function.

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Corresponding author
* Corresponding author: J. L. Madsen, fax +45 3862 3750, email jan.lysgaard.madsen@regionh.dk
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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