Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Acute effects on metabolism and appetite profile of one meal difference in the lower range of meal frequency

  • Astrid J. Smeets (a1) and Margriet S. Westerterp-Plantenga (a2)
Abstract

A gorging pattern of food intake has been shown to enhance lipogenesis and increase body weight, which may be due to large fluctuations in storage and mobilisation of nutrients. In a state of energy balance, increasing meal frequency, and thereby decreasing inter-meal interval, may prevent large metabolic fluctuations. Our aim was to study the effect of the inter-meal interval by dividing energy intake over two or three meals on energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and 24 h satiety, in healthy, normal-weight women in a state of energy balance. The study was a randomised crossover design with two experimental conditions. During the two experimental conditions subjects (fourteen normal-weight women, aged 24·4 (sd 7·1) years, underwent 36 h sessions in energy balance in a respiration chamber for measurements of energy expenditure and substrate oxidation. The subjects were given two (breakfast, dinner) or three (breakfast, lunch, dinner) meals per d. We chose to omit lunch in the two meals condition, because this resulted in a marked difference in inter-meal-interval after breakfast (8·5 h v. 4 h). Eating three meals compared with two meals had no effects on 24 h energy expenditure, diet-induced thermogenesis, activity-induced energy expenditure and sleeping metabolic rate. Eating three meals compared with two meals increased 24 h fat oxidation, but decreased the amount of fat oxidised from the breakfast. The same amount of energy divided over three meals compared with over two meals increased satiety feelings over 24 h. In healthy, normal-weight women, decreasing the inter-meal interval sustains satiety, particularly during the day, and sustains fat oxidation, particularly during the night.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Acute effects on metabolism and appetite profile of one meal difference in the lower range of meal frequency
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Acute effects on metabolism and appetite profile of one meal difference in the lower range of meal frequency
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Acute effects on metabolism and appetite profile of one meal difference in the lower range of meal frequency
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Astrid Smeets, fax+31 433670976, email astrid.smeets@hb.unimaas.nl
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

6 MS Westerterp-Plantenga , NA Wijckmans-Duysens & F Ten Hoor (1994) Food intake in the daily environment after energy-reduced lunch, related to habitual meal frequency. Appetite 22, 173182.

7 DP Speechly & R Buffenstein (1999) Greater appetite control associated with an increased frequency of eating in lean males. Appetite 33, 285297.

8 C Zizza , AM Siega-Riz & BM Popkin (2001) Significant increase in young adults' snacking between 1977–1978 and 1994–1996 represents a cause for concern! Prev Med 32, 303310.

10 D Chapelot , C Marmonier , R Aubert , C Allegre , N Gausseres , M Fantino & J Louis-Sylvestre (2006) Consequence of omitting or adding a meal in man on body composition, food intake, and metabolism. Obesity (Silver Spring) 14, 215227.

11 AJ Stunkard & S Messick (1985) The three-factor eating questionnaire to measure dietary restraint, disinhibition and hunger. J Psychosom Res 29, 7183.

12 JA Harris & FG Benedict (1918) A biometric study of human basal metabolism. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 4, 370373.

14 WE Siri (1956) The gross composition of the body. Adv Biol Med Phys 4, 239280.

16 KR Westerterp , SA Wilson & V Rolland (1999) Diet induced thermogenesis measured over 24 h in a respiration chamber: effect of diet composition. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 23, 287292.

18 SB Votruba , SM Zeddun & DA Schoeller (2001) Validation of deuterium labeled fatty acids for the measurement of dietary fat oxidation: a method for measuring fat-oxidation in free-living subjects. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 25, 12401245.

21 MS Westerterp-Plantenga , EM Kovacs & KJ Melanson (2002) Habitual meal frequency and energy intake regulation in partially temporally isolated men. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 26, 102110.

23 SJ Jackson , FE Leahy , SA Jebb , AM Prentice , WA Coward & LJ Bluck (2007) Frequent feeding delays the gastric emptying of a subsequent meal. Appetite 48, 199205.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 71
Total number of PDF views: 527 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 1097 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 24th September 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.