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    Fernández-García, Elisabet Carvajal-Lérida, Irene Jarén-Galán, Manuel Garrido-Fernández, Juan Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio and Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso 2012. Carotenoids bioavailability from foods: From plant pigments to efficient biological activities. Food Research International, Vol. 46, Issue. 2, p. 438.


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An in vitro method for estimating biologically available vitamin B6 in processed foods

  • Athula Ekanayake (a1) and Philip E. Nelson (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1079/BJN19860030
  • Published online: 01 March 2007
Abstract

1. An in vitro method which used enzymic digestion of the food matrix to release biologically available vitamin B6 is described.

2. Vitamin B6-fortified liquid model foods were thermally processed. After these foods had been freeze-dried, one part was subjected to enzymic hydrolysis at pH 2.0 with pepsin (EC 3.4.23.1) followed by a hydrolysis at pH 8.0 with pancreatin. The vitamins that were found in the supernatant fraction, after an acidified methanol treatment of the hydrolysate, were estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The other part was given to rats who were kept on a vitamin B6-depleted diet.

3. The biologically available vitamin B6 content of the processed model foods, as determined by rat bioassay, showed good correlation with the vitamin B6 determined by HPLC.

4. It has proved possible to use this in vitro, two-stage enzymic digestion system followed by HPLC determination to determine biologically available vitamin B6 in vitamin B6-fortified processed model foods.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

J. F. Gregory (1980 b). Journal of Food Science 45, 8486.

J. F. Gregory & J. R. Kirk (1978). Journal of Food Science 43, 15851589.

J. F. Gregory & J. R. Kirk (1981 a). In Methods in Vitamin B6 Nutrition, pp. 149170 [J. E. Leklem and R. D. Reynolds , editors], New York: Plenum Press.

K. J. Nelson & N. N. Potter (1980). Journal of Food Science 45, 5255.

F. W. I. Teale & J. Weber (1957). Biochemical Journal 65, 476482.

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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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