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The application of probiotics in cancer

  • Alejandra de Moreno de LeBlanc (a1), Chantal Matar (a2) and Gabriela Perdigón (a1) (a3)
Abstract

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are present in many foods such as yoghurt and are frequently used as probiotics to favour some biological functions in the host. Many investigators have evaluated the therapeutic effects of yoghurt and LAB commonly used in yoghurt production against diseases such as cancer, infection, and gastrointestinal disorders. The increase of immune cell activity in the prevention of cancer by LAB consumption has also been described. Another possible explanation for the preventive effect of probiotics on carcinogenesis is their effect on other bacteria in the intestine. Probiotics may suppress the growth of bacteria that convert procarcinogens into carcinogens, thereby reducing the amount of carcinogens in the intestine. The present review is focused on two types of cancer in which milk fermented by LAB may show a beneficial effect: colon cancer and breast cancer

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Gabriela Perdigón, fax: 54-381-4005600, email perdigon@cerela.org.ar
References
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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