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Are organically grown foods safer and more healthful than conventionally grown foods?

  • Mark F. McCarty (a1) and James J. DiNicolantonio (a2)
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References
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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