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The bromine content of human tissue

  • R. F. Crampton (a1), P. S. Elias (a1) and S. D. Gangolli (a1)
Abstract

1. A comparison of human tissue organo-bromine residues has been made from specimens obtained in the UK, West Germany and Holland.

2. These findings, in conjunction with previous animal studies and with the geographical differences in the use of brominated vegetable oils as food additives, suggest that the high bromine levels found in the fat of tissues from UK children are due to the use of these compounds.

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References
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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