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The cat as a model for human obesity: insights into depot-specific inflammation associated with feline obesity

  • H. Van de Velde (a1), G. P. J. Janssens (a1), H. de Rooster (a2), I. Polis (a2), I. Peters (a3), R. Ducatelle (a4), P. Nguyen (a5), J. Buyse (a6), K. Rochus (a1), J. Xu (a1), A. Verbrugghe (a1) and M. Hesta (a1)...

Abstract

According to human research, the location of fat accumulation seems to play an important role in the induction of obesity-related inflammatory complications. To evaluate whether an inflammatory response to obesity depends on adipose tissue location, adipokine gene expression, presence of immune cells and adipocyte cell size of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) were compared between lean and obese cats. Additionally, the present study proposes the cat as a model for human obesity and highlights the importance of animal models for human research. A total of ten chronically obese and ten lean control cats were included in the present study. Body weight, body condition score and body composition were determined. T-lymphocyte, B-lymphocyte, macrophage concentrations and adipocyte cell size were measured in adipose tissue at different locations. Serum leptin concentration and the mRNA expression of leptin and adiponectin, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, chemoligand-5, IL-8, TNF-α, interferon-γ, IL-6 and IL-10 were measured in blood and adipose tissues (abdominal and inguinal SAT, and omental, bladder and renal VAT). Feline obesity was characterised by increased adipocyte cell size and altered adipokine gene expression, in favour of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Consequently, concentration of T-lymphocytes was increased in the adipose tissue of obese cats. Alteration of adipose tissue was location dependent in both lean and obese cats. Moreover, the observed changes were more prominent in SAT compared with VAT.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: H. V. de Velde, fax +32 264 78 48, email vandevelde.hannelore@gmail.com

References

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Keywords

The cat as a model for human obesity: insights into depot-specific inflammation associated with feline obesity

  • H. Van de Velde (a1), G. P. J. Janssens (a1), H. de Rooster (a2), I. Polis (a2), I. Peters (a3), R. Ducatelle (a4), P. Nguyen (a5), J. Buyse (a6), K. Rochus (a1), J. Xu (a1), A. Verbrugghe (a1) and M. Hesta (a1)...

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