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Curcumin as a therapeutic agent: the evidence from in vitro, animal and human studies

  • Jenny Epstein (a1), Ian R. Sanderson (a1) and Thomas T. MacDonald (a1)
Abstract

Curcumin is the active ingredient of turmeric. It is widely used as a kitchen spice and food colorant throughout India, Asia and the Western world. Curcumin is a major constituent of curry powder, to which it imparts its characteristic yellow colour. For over 4000 years, curcumin has been used in traditional Asian and African medicine to treat a wide variety of ailments. There is a strong current public interest in naturally occurring plant-based remedies and dietary factors related to health and disease. Curcumin is non-toxic to human subjects at high doses. It is a complex molecule with multiple biological targets and different cellular effects. Recently, its molecular mechanisms of action have been extensively investigated. It has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-cancer properties. Under some circumstances its effects can be contradictory, with uncertain implications for human treatment. While more studies are warranted to further understand these contradictions, curcumin holds promise as a disease-modifying and chemopreventive agent. We review the evidence for the therapeutic potential of curcumin from in vitro studies, animal models and human clinical trials.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Jenny Epstein, fax +44 2078822187, email j.epstein@qmul.ac.uk
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

128 G Liang , H Zhou , Y Wang , (2009) Inhibition of LPS-induced production of inflammatory factors in the macrophages by mono-carbonyl analogues of Curcumin. J Cell Mol Med.

171 S Purkayastha , A Berliner , SS Fernando , (2009) Curcumin blocks brain tumor formation. Brain Res.

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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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