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Decaffeinated green coffee bean extract and the components of the metabolic syndrome

  • Tomoyuki Kawada (a1)
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References
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1. Roshan, H, Nikpayam, O, Sedaghat, M, et al. (2018) Effects of green coffee extract supplementation on anthropometric indices, glycaemic control, blood pressure, lipid profile, insulin resistance and appetite in patients with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised clinical trial. Br J Nutr 119, 250258.
2. Sarriá, B, Martínez-López, S, Sierra-Cinos, JL, et al. (2018) Regularly consuming a green/roasted coffee blend reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome. Eur J Nutr 57, 269278.
3. Suliga, E, Koziel, D, Ciesla, E, et al. (2017) Coffee consumption and the occurrence and intensity of metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional study. Int J Food Sci Nutr 68, 507513.
4. Micek, A, Grosso, G, Polak, M, et al. (2018) Association between tea and coffee consumption and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Poland – results from the WOBASZ II study (2013–2014). Int J Food Sci Nutr 69, 358368.
5. Baeza, G, Sarriá, B, Bravo, L, et al. (2018) Polyphenol content, in vitro bioaccessibility and antioxidant capacity of widely consumed beverages. J Sci Food Agric 98, 13971406.
6. Gómez-Juaristi, M, Martínez-López, S, Sarria, B, et al. (2018) Bioavailability of hydroxycinnamates in an instant green/roasted coffee blend in humans. Identification of novel colonic metabolites. Food Funct 9, 331343.
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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