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Decomposition of body mass growth into linear and ponderal growth in children with application to India

  • Aalok R. Chaurasia (a1)
Abstract
Abstract

In this paper, we decompose the difference between the weight of a child and the weight of a reference child into the difference between the height of the child and the height of the reference child and the difference between the weight per unit height of the child and the weight per unit height of the reference child. The decomposition provides the theoretical justification to the classification of the nutritional status proposed by Svedberg and by Nandy et al. An application of the decomposition framework to the Indian data shows that the level, depth and severity of the faltering of the growth of the body mass in Indian children are primarily due to the level, depth and severity of the faltering of the ponderal growth.

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* Corresponding author: A. R. Chaurasia, email aranjan@shyaminstitute.in
References
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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