Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Cited by 60
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Brandt, Kirsten 2016. Molecular Basis of Nutrition and Aging.


    Grassi, Tony F. da Silva, Glenda N. Bidinotto, Lucas T. Rossi, Bruna F. Quinalha, Marília M. Kass, Laura Muñoz-de-Toro, Mónica and Barbisan, Luís F. 2016. Global gene expression and morphological alterations in the mammary gland after gestational exposure to bisphenol A, genistein and indole-3-carbinol in female Sprague-Dawley offspring. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, Vol. 303, p. 101.


    Kapusta-Duch, Joanna Kusznierewicz, Barbara Leszczyńska, Teresa and Borczak, Barbara 2016. Effect of Culinary Treatment on Changes in the Contents of Selected Nutrients and Non-Nutrients in Curly Kale (Brassica oleraceaVar.acephala). Journal of Food Processing and Preservation,


    Kapusta-Duch, Joanna Kusznierewicz, Barbara Leszczyńska, Teresa and Borczak, Barbara 2016. Effect of cooking on the contents of glucosinolates and their degradation products in selected Brassica vegetables. Journal of Functional Foods, Vol. 23, p. 412.


    Possenti, Marco Baima, Simona Raffo, Antonio Durazzo, Alessandra Giusti, Anna Maria and Natella, Fausta 2016. Glucosinolates.


    Thomson, Cynthia A. Ho, Emily and Strom, Meghan B. 2016. Chemopreventive properties of 3,3′-diindolylmethane in breast cancer: evidence from experimental and human studies. Nutrition Reviews, Vol. 74, Issue. 7, p. 432.


    Wang, Ping-Yu Fang, Jun-Chao Gao, Zong-Hua Zhang, Can and Xie, Shu-Yang 2016. Higher intake of fruits, vegetables or their fiber reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes: A meta-analysis. Journal of Diabetes Investigation, Vol. 7, Issue. 1, p. 56.


    Zou, Minghua Zhang, Xianquan and Xu, Changhua 2016. IL6-induced metastasis modulators p-STAT3, MMP-2 and MMP-9 are targets of 3,3′-diindolylmethane in ovarian cancer cells. Cellular Oncology, Vol. 39, Issue. 1, p. 47.


    Alanís-Garza, Pedro A. Becerra-Moreno, Alejandro Mora-Nieves, José Luis Mora-Mora, Juan Pablo and Jacobo-Velázquez, Daniel A. 2015. Effect of industrial freezing on the stability of chemopreventive compounds in broccoli. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, Vol. 66, Issue. 3, p. 282.


    Blažević, Ivica Montaut, Sabine Burčul, Franko and Rollin, Patrick 2015. Glucosinolates.


    Hoffman, Richard and Gerber, Mariette 2015. Food Processing and the Mediterranean Diet. Nutrients, Vol. 7, Issue. 9, p. 7925.


    Hwang, Eun-Sun and Thi, Nhuan Do 2015. Impact of Cooking Method on Bioactive Compound Content and Antioxidant Capacity of Cabbage. Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology, Vol. 47, Issue. 2, p. 184.


    Nugrahedi, Probo Y. Verkerk, Ruud Widianarko, Budi and Dekker, Matthijs 2015. A Mechanistic Perspective on Process-Induced Changes in Glucosinolate Content inBrassicaVegetables: A Review. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, Vol. 55, Issue. 6, p. 823.


    Royston, Kendra J. and Tollefsbol, Trygve O. 2015. The Epigenetic Impact of Cruciferous Vegetables on Cancer Prevention. Current Pharmacology Reports, Vol. 1, Issue. 1, p. 46.


    Sansom, Catherine E. Jones, Veronika S. Joyce, Nigel I. Smallfield, Bruce M. Perry, Nigel B. and van Klink, John W. 2015. Flavor, Glucosinolates, and Isothiocyanates of Nau (Cook’s Scurvy Grass,Lepidium oleraceum) and Other Rare New ZealandLepidiumSpecies. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 63, Issue. 6, p. 1833.


    Veeranki, Omkara L. Bhattacharya, Arup Tang, Li Marshall, James R. and Zhang, Yuesheng 2015. Cruciferous Vegetables, Isothiocyanates, and Prevention of Bladder Cancer. Current Pharmacology Reports, Vol. 1, Issue. 4, p. 272.


    Beck, Tove K. Jensen, Sidsel Bjoern, Gitte K. and Kidmose, Ulla 2014. The Masking Effect of Sucrose on Perception of Bitter Compounds inBrassicaVegetables. Journal of Sensory Studies, Vol. 29, Issue. 3, p. 190.


    Bell, Luke and Wagstaff, Carol 2014. Glucosinolates, Myrosinase Hydrolysis Products, and Flavonols Found in Rocket (Eruca sativaandDiplotaxis tenuifolia). Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 62, Issue. 20, p. 4481.


    Cirignano, Sherri M. and Morgan, Kathleen T. 2014. The Role of Carotenoid- and Glucosinolate-Containing Vegetables in Cancer Prevention and Their Promotion in Clinical Practice. Topics in Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 29, Issue. 1, p. 33.


    Lakkur, Sindhu Goodman, Michael Bostick, Roberd M. Citronberg, Jessica McClellan, William Flanders, William Dana Judd, Suzanne and Stevens, Victoria L. 2014. Oxidative balance score and risk for incident prostate cancer in a prospective U.S. cohort study. Annals of Epidemiology, Vol. 24, Issue. 6, p. 475.


    ×

Development of a food composition database for the estimation of dietary intakes of glucosinolates, the biologically active constituents of cruciferous vegetables

  • S. A. McNaughton (a1) and G. C. Marks (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1079/BJN2003917
  • Published online: 01 March 2007
Abstract

Evidence indicates that cruciferous vegetables are protective against a range of cancers with glucosinolates and their breakdown products considered the biologically active constituents. To date, epidemiological studies have not investigated the intakes of these constituents due to a lack of food composition databases. The aim of the present study was to develop a database for the glucosinolate content of cruciferous vegetables that can be used to quantify dietary exposure for use in epidemiological studies of diet–disease relationships. Published food composition data sources for the glucosinolate content of cruciferous vegetables were identified and assessed for data quality using established criteria. Adequate data for the total glucosinolate content were available from eighteen published studies providing 140 estimates for forty-two items. The highest glucosinolate values were for cress (389 mg/100 g) while the lowest values were for Pe-tsai chinese cabbage (20 mg/100 g). There is considerable variation in the values reported for the same vegetable by different studies, with a median difference between the minimum and maximum values of 5·8-fold. Limited analysis of cooked cruciferous vegetables has been conducted; however, the available data show that average losses during cooking are approximately 36 %. This is the first attempt to collate the available literature on the glucosinolate content of cruciferous vegetables. These data will allow quantification of intakes of the glucosinolates, which can be used in epidemiological studies to investigate the role of cruciferous vegetables in cancer aetiology and prevention.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Development of a food composition database for the estimation of dietary intakes of glucosinolates, the biologically active constituents of cruciferous vegetables
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Development of a food composition database for the estimation of dietary intakes of glucosinolates, the biologically active constituents of cruciferous vegetables
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Development of a food composition database for the estimation of dietary intakes of glucosinolates, the biologically active constituents of cruciferous vegetables
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Ms S. A. McNaughton, present address MRC Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, Fulbourn Road, Cambridge CB1 9NL, UK, fax +44 1223 437515, email Sarah.Mcnaughton@mrc-hnr.cam.ac.uk
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

DG Carlson , ME Daxenbichler , CH VanEtten , HL Tookey & PH Williams (1981) Glucosinolates in crucifer vegetables: turnips and rutabagas. J Agric Food Chem 29, 12351239.

ME Daxenbichler , CH VanEtten & PH Williams (1979) Glucosinolates and derived products in cruciferous vegetables. Analysis of 14 varieties of Chinese cabbage. J Agric Food Chem 27, 3437.

AP De Groot , MI Willems & Vos RH De (1991) Effects of high levels of brussels sprouts in the diet of rats. Food Chem Toxicol 29, 829837.

M Dekker , R Verkerk & WMF Jongen (2000) Predictive modelling of health aspects in the food production chain: a case study on glucosinolates in cabbage. Trends Food Sci Technol 11, 174181.

RH De Vos & WGH Blijleven (1988) The effect of processing conditions on glucosinolates in cruciferous vegetables. Z Lebensm Unters Forsch 187, 525529.

GR Fenwick , RK Heaney & WJ Mullin (1983) Glucosinolates and their breakdown products in food and food plants. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 18, 123201.

RM Goodrich , RS Parker , DJ Lisk & GS Stoewsand (1988) Glucosinolate, carotene and cadmium content of Brassica oleracea grown on municipal sewage sludge. Food Chem 27, 141150.

M Hansen , AM Laustsen , CE Olsen , L Poll & H Sorensen (1997) Chemical and sensory quality of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var italica). J Food Qual 20, 441459.

RK Heaney & GR Fenwick (1980) Glucosinolates in Brassica vegetables. Analysis of 22 varieties of Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea var. gemmifera). J Sci Food Agric 31, 785793.

D Jiao , MC Yu , JH Habnkin , (1998) Total isothiocyanate contents in cooked vegetables frequently consumed in Singapore. J Agric Food Chem 46, 10551058.

MM Kushad , AF Brown , AC Kurilich , (1999) Variation of glucosinolates in vegetable crops of Brassica oleracea. J Agric Food Chem 47, 15411548.

J Lewis & GR Fenwick (1987) Glucosinolate content of Brassica vegetables: analysis of twenty-four cultivars of calabrese (green sprouting broccoli, Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis subvar. cymosa Lam.). Food Chem 25, 259268.

J Lewis & GR Fenwick (1988) Glucosinolate content of Brassica vegetables – Chinese cabbages Pe-tsai (Brassica pekinensis) and Pak-choi (Brassica chinensis). J Sci Food Agric 45, 379386.

R McDanell , AE McLean , AB Hanley , RK Heaney & GR Fenwick (1988) Chemical and biological properties of indole glucosinolates (glucobrassicins): a review. Food Chem Toxicol 26, 5970.

M McMillan , EA Spinks & GR Fenwick (1986) Preliminary observations on the effect of dietary brussels sprouts on thyroid function. Human Toxicol 5, 1519.

AR Mangels , JM Holden , GR Beecher , MR Forman & E Lanza (1993) Carotenoid content of fruits and vegetables: an evaluation of analytic data. J Am Diet Assoc 93, 284296.

M Nestle (1998) Broccoli sprouts in cancer prevention. Nutr Rev 56, 127130.

J Peterson & J Dwyer (2000) An informatics approach to flavonoid database development. J Food Comp Anal 13, 441454.

PC Pillow , CM Duphorne , S Chang , (1999) Development of a database for assessing dietary phytoestrogen intake. Nutr Cancer 33, 319.

K Reinli & G Block (1996) Phytoestrogen content of foods – a compendium of literature values. Nutr Cancer 26, 123148.

AS Rodrigues & EAS Rosa (1999) Effect of post-harvest treatments on the level of glucosinolates in broccoli. J Sci Food Agric 79, 10281032.

EAS Rosa & RK Heaney (1993) The effect of cooking and processing on the glucosinolate content: studies on four varieties of Portuguese cabbage and hybrid white cabbage. J Sci Food Agric 62, 259265.

VI Shattuck & W Wang (1994) Growth stress induces glucosinolate changes in pakchoy (Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis). Can J Plant Sci 74, 595601.

K Sones , RK Heaney & GR Fenwick (1984 a) An estimate of the mean daily intake of glucosinolates from cruciferous vegetables in the UK. J Sci Food Agric 35, 712719.

K Sones , RK Heaney & GR Fenwick (1984 b) The glucosinolate content of UK vegetables – cabbage (Brassica oleracea), swede (B. Napus) and turnip (B. capestris). Food Addit Contam 1, 289296.

K Sones , RK Heaney & GR Fenwick (1984 c) Glucosinolates in Brassica vegetables Analysis of twenty-seven cauliflower cultivars (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis subvar. cauliflora DC). J Sci Food Agric 35, 762766.

KA Steinmetz & JD Potter (1991) Vegetables, fruit and cancer. II. Mechanisms. Cancer Causes Control 2, 427442.

HGM Tiedink , JAR Davies , LW Van Broekhoven , HJ Van Der Kamp & WMF Jongen (1988) Formation of mutagenic N-nitroso compounds in vegetable extracts upon nitrite treatment: a comparison with the glucosinolate content. Food Chem Toxicol 26, 947954.

HE Van Doorn , Kruk GC Van Der & GJ Van Holst (1999) Large scale determination of glucosinolates in Brussels sprouts samples after degradation of endogenous glucose. J Agric Food Chem 47, 10291034.

G Van Poppel , DT Verhoeven , H Verhagan & RA Goldbohm (1999) Brassica vegetables and cancer prevention: Epidemiology and mechanisms. Adv Exp Med and Biol 472, 159168.

DTH Verhoeven , H Verhagan , RA Goldbohm , Brandt PA Van der & Poppel G Van (1997) A review of mechanisms underlying anticarcinogenicity by brassica vegetables. Chem Biol Interact 103, 79129.

R Verkerk , M Dekker & WMF Jongen (2001) Post-harvest increase of indolyl glucosinolates in response to chopping and storage of Brassica vegetables. J Sci Food Agric 81, 953958.

R Verkerk , Gaag MS Van der , M Dekker & WM Jongen (1997) Effects of processing conditions on glucosinolates in cruciferous vegetables. Cancer Lett 114, 193194.

GC Yen & QK Wei (1993) Myrosinase activity and total glucosinolate content of cruciferous vegetables, and some properties of cabbage myrosinase in Taiwan. J Sci Food Agric 61, 471475.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: