Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Increased dietary protein consumed at breakfast leads to an initial and sustained feeling of fullness during energy restriction compared to other meal times

  • Heather J. Leidy (a1) (a2), Mandi J. Bossingham (a1), Richard D. Mattes (a1) and Wayne W. Campbell (a1)
Abstract

The objective of the study was to assess whether the timing of increased dietary protein throughout the day influences the feelings of fullness during energy balance (EB) and restriction (ER). Nine men (age 48 (sem 6) years; BMI 32·7 (sem 0·7) kg/m2) randomly completed five controlled feeding trials, each consisting of 3 d of EB, followed by 3 d of ER of a 3138 kJ/d (750 kcal/d) reduction). The diet was composed of a normal amount of protein (NP) (0·8 g protein/kg per d), or an additional amount of protein (HP) (+0·6 g protein/kg per d) given at breakfast (HP-B), lunch (HP-L), dinner (HP-D) or equally divided among all meals (HP-E). Meal-related (3 h postprandial) and overall (15 h composite) feelings of fullness were assessed from thirteen-point, numbered, linear category scale questionnaires (reported as arbitrary units (au)). When comparing HP treatments, the data are presented as difference from NP. No differences in meal-related or overall fullness were observed among HP treatments during EB. During ER, the HP-B led to greater meal-related fullness (+137 (sem 44) au × 180 min) compared to HP-D ( − 1 (sem 37) au × 180 min; P = 0·003), but not for HP-L (+62 (sem 53) au × 180 min; P = 0·188) or HP-E-B (+92 (sem 85) au × 180 min; P = 0·587). HP-B also led to greater overall (15 h) fullness (+404 (sem 162) au × 900 min) v. HP-L (+33 (sem 162) au × 900 min; P = 0·009) and HP-D ( − 60 (sem 132) au × 900 min; P = 0·05), but not HP-E (+274 (sem 165) au × 900 min; P = 0·188). The initial and sustained feelings of fullness following protein consumption at breakfast suggests that the timing of protein intake differentially influences satiety during ER.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Increased dietary protein consumed at breakfast leads to an initial and sustained feeling of fullness during energy restriction compared to other meal times
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Increased dietary protein consumed at breakfast leads to an initial and sustained feeling of fullness during energy restriction compared to other meal times
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Increased dietary protein consumed at breakfast leads to an initial and sustained feeling of fullness during energy restriction compared to other meal times
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Heather J. Leidy, The University of Kansas Medical Center, fax +1 913 588 8946, email hleidy@kumc.edu
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

1A Keski-Rahkonen , J Kaprio , A Rissanen , M Virkkunen & RJ Rose (2003) Breakfast skipping and health-compromising behaviors in adolescents and adults. Eur J Clin Nutr 57, 842853.

3AAWA van der Heijden , FB Hu , EB Rim & RM van Dam (2007) A prospective study of breakfast consumption and weight gain among U.S. men. Obesity 15, 24632469.

4LR Purslow , MS Sandhu , N Forouhi , EH Young , RN Luben , AA Welch , K-T Khaw , SA Bingham & NJ Wareham (2008) Energy intake at breakfast and weight change: prospective study of 6764 middle-aged men and women. Am J Epidemiol 167, 188192.

5WO Song , OK Chun , S Obayashi , S Cho & CE Chung (2005) Is consumption of breakfast associated with body mass index in US adults? J Am Diet Assoc 105, 13731382.

7TL Halton & FB Hu (2004) The effects of high protein diets on thermogenesis, satiety and weight loss: a critical review. J Am Coll Nutr 23, 373385.

8HJ Leidy , RD Mattes & WW Campbell (2007) Effects of acute and chronic protein intake on metabolism, appetite, and ghrelin during weight loss. Obesity 15, 12151225.

11JD Latner & M Schwartz (1999) The effects of a high-carbohydrate, high-protein or balanced lunch upon later food intake and hunger ratings. Appetite 33, 119128.

12BA Parker , K Sturm , CG MacIntosh , C Feinle , M Horowitz & IM Chapman (2004) Relation between food intake and visual analogue scale ratings of appetite and other sensations in healthy older and young subjects. Eur J Clin Nutr 58, 212218.

15SJ Long , AR Jeffcoat & DJ Millward (2000) Effect of habitual dietary-protein intake on appetite and satiety. Appetite 35, 7988.

16LJ Moran , ND Luscombe-Marsh , M Noakes , GA Wittert , JB Keogh & PM Clifton (2005) The satiating effect of dietary protein is unrelated to postprandial ghrelin secretion. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 90, 52055211.

18A Flint , A Raben , JE Blundell & A Astrup (2000) Reproducibility, power and validity of visual analogue scales in assessment of appetite sensations in single test meal studies. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 24, 3848.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: