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Don’t lose sight of the forest for the trees: recognising the benefits as well as the limitations of implementation research

  • Carly J. Moores (a1), Richard J. Woodman (a2), Jacqueline Miller (a1) (a3), Helen A. Vidgen (a4) and Anthea M. Magarey (a1)...
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1. Hannon, BA, Thomas, DM, Siu, C, et al. (2018) The claim that effectiveness has been demonstrated in the Parenting, Eating and Activity for Child Health (PEACH) childhood obesity intervention is unsubstantiated by the data. Br J Nutr 120, 958959.
2. Moores, CJ, Miller, J, Daniels, LA, et al. (2018) Pre-post evaluation of a weight management service for families with overweight and obese children, translated from the efficacious lifestyle intervention Parenting, Eating and Activity for Child Health (PEACH). Br J Nutr 119, 14341445.
3. Twisk, J, Bosman, L, Hoekstra, T, et al. (2018) Different ways to estimate treatment effects in randomised controlled trials. Cont Clin Trial Comm 10, 8085.
4. Moores, CJ, Miller, J, Perry, RA, et al. (2017) CONSORT to community: translation of an RCT to a large-scale community intervention and learnings from evaluation of the upscaled program. BMC Public Health 17, 918.
5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2016) A SAS Program for the 2000 CDC Growth Charts (ages 0 to <20 years). https://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/growthcharts/resources/sas.htm#modalIdString_CDCTable_1 (accessed June 2017).
6. Morton, V & Torgerson, DJ (2003) Effect of regression to the mean on decision making in health care. Br Med J 326, 10831084.
7. Croyden, DL, Vidgen, HA, Esdaile, E, et al. (2018) A narrative account of implementation lessons learnt from the dissemination of an up-scaled state-wide child obesity management program in Australia: PEACH (Parenting, Eating and Activity for Child Health) Queensland. BMC Public Health 18, 347.
8. Cole, TJ & Lobstein, T (2012) Extended international (IOTF) body mass index cut-offs for thinness, overweight and obesity. Pediatr Obes 7, 284294.
9. McCambridge, J, Witton, J & Elbourne, DR (2014) Systematic review of the Hawthorne effect: new concepts are needed to study research participation effects. J Clin Epidemiol 67, 267277.
10. Glasgow, RE, Vogt, TM & Boles, SM (1999) Evaluating the public health impact of health promotion interventions: the RE-AIM framework. Am J Public Health 89, 13221327.
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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