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Effect of coffee and tea on the glycaemic index of foods: no effect on mean but reduced variability

  • Ahmed Aldughpassi (a1) and Thomas M. S. Wolever (a1)
Abstract

Coffee and tea may influence glycaemic responses but it is not clear whether they affect the glycaemic index (GI) value of foods. Therefore, to see if coffee and tea affected the mean and sem of GI values, the GI of fruit leather (FL) and cheese puffs (CP) were determined twice in ten subjects using the FAO/WHO protocol with white bread as the reference food. In one series subjects chose to drink 250 ml of either coffee or tea with all test meals, while in the other series they drank 250 ml water. The tests for both series were conducted as a single experiment with the order of all tests being randomised. Coffee and tea increased the overall mean peak blood glucose increment compared with water by 0·25 (sem 0·09) mmol/l (P = 0·02), but did not significantly affect the incremental area under the glucose response curve. Mean GI values were not affected by coffee or tea but the sem was reduced by about 30 % (FL: 31 (sem 4) v. 35 (sem 7) and CP: 76 (sem 6) v. 75 (sem 8) for coffee or tea v. water, respectively). The error mean square term from the ANOVA of the GI values was significantly smaller for coffee or tea v. water (F(18, 18) = 2·31; P = 0·04). We conclude that drinking coffee or tea with test meals does not affect the mean GI value obtained, but may reduce variability and, hence, improve precision.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Thomas M. S. Wolever, fax +1 416 978 5882, email thomas.wolever@utoronto.ca
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17 M Horowitz , MAL Edelbroek , JM Wishart , . (1993) Relationship between oral glucose tolerance and gastric emptying in normal healthy subjects. Diabetologia 36, 857862.

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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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