Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

The effect of pectin on the structure and function of the rat small intestine

  • R. C. Brown (a1), J. Kelleher (a1) and M. S. Losowsky (a1)

Abstract

1. The effect of pectin on the structure and function of the rat small intestine was compared with that of a standard pellet diet and of a fibre-free basal diet.

2. The length and wet weight of the small bowel was significantly greater inpect in-fed rats than in either pellet- or basal-diet-fed rats.

3. Histological measurements of longitudinal sections from the small bowel showed a significantly greater crypt depth and muscle layer thickness in the mid-jejunum and ileum of the pectin fed rats. Villous height showed less variation.

4. The specific activity of alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1)and leucyl-P-naphthylamidase (EC 3.4.11.1) in mucosal scrapings was significantly lower in the upper jejunum of pectin-fed rats compared with either of the other dietary groups. The differences were not so marked in mid-jejunum or ileum.

5. Glucose absorption measured in vivo from jejunal and ileal loops was similar in all three dietary groups.

6. With two minor exceptions there were no significant differences in any of these measurements between the pellet- and basal-diet-fed rats.

7. These findings could be explained by increased epithelial cell turnover caused by pectin. The possible mechanisms of this are discussed.

8. The effect of pectin on the human small bowel requires study before it can be widely prescribed in man.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The effect of pectin on the structure and function of the rat small intestine
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The effect of pectin on the structure and function of the rat small intestine
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The effect of pectin on the structure and function of the rat small intestine
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Addis, T. (1932). Am. J. Physiol. 99. 417.
Brown, R. C., Kelleher, J., Walker, B. E. & Losowsky, M. S. (1979). Br. J. Nutr. 41, 455.
Cullen, R. W. & Oace, S. M. (1978). J. Nutr. 108, 640.
Dowling, R. H., Riecken, E. O., Laws, J. W. & Booth, C. C. (1967). Clin. Sci. 32, 1.
Dunnill, M.S. & Whitehead, R. (1972). J. clin. Path. 25, 243.
Ershoff, N. H. (1974). Am. J. clin. Nutr. 27, 1395.
Fischer, J. E. (1957). Am. J. Physiol. 188, 550.
Gleeson, M. H., Cullen, J. & Dowling, R. H. (1972). Clin. Sci. 43, 731.
Gleeson, M.H., Dowling, R. H. & Peters, T. J. (1972). Clin. Sci. 43, 743.
Hatcher, D. W. & Goldstein, G. (1969). Analyt. Biochem. 31, 42.
Hyden, S. (1956). K. LantbrHögsk. Annlr 22, 411.
Jenkins, D. J. A., Leeds, A. R., Newton, C. & Cummings, J. H. (1975). Lancer i, 1116.
Kay, R. M. & Truswell, A. S. (1977). Am. J. clin. Nutr. 30, 171.
Krebs, H. A. & Henseleit, K. (1932). Hoppe-Seyler's Z. Physiol. Chem. 210, 33.
Leveille, G. A. & Sauberlich, H. E. (1966). J. Nutr. 88, 209.
Lowry, O. H., Rosebrough, N. J., Farr, A. L. & Randall, R. J. (1951). J. biol. Chem. 193, 265.
Miettinen, T. A. & Tarpiia, S. (1977). Clinica chim. Acta 79, 471.
Nordström, C. & Dahlqvist, A. (1973). Scand. J. Gastroenterol. 8, 407.
Peters, T. J., Müller, M. & de Duve, C. (1972). J. exp. Med. 136, 1117.
Sheff, M. F. & Smyth, D. H. (1955). J. Physiol., Lond. 128, 67P.
Truswell, A. S. (1977). Nutr. Rev. 35, 51.
Wierda, J. L. (1950). Anat. Rec. 107, 221.
Younoszai, M. K., Adedoyin, M. & Ranshaw, J. (1978). J. Nutr. 108, 341.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed