Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

The effect of short-term coenzyme Q10 supplementation and pre-cooling strategy on cardiac damage markers in elite swimmers

  • Ali Emami (a1), Asghar Tofighi (a1), Siamak Asri-Rezaei (a2) and Behnaz Bazargani-Gilani (a3)

Abstract

Strenuous physical exercise and hyperthermia may paradoxically induce oxidative stress and adverse effects on myocardial function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 14-d coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation and pre-cooling on serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), cardiac Troponin I (cTnI), myoglobin (Mb), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and CoQ10 concentration in elite swimmers. In total, thirty-six healthy males (mean age 17 (sd 1) years) were randomly selected and divided into four groups of supplementation, supplementation with pre-cooling, pre-cooling and control. During an eighteen-session protocol in the morning and evening, subjects attended speed and endurance swimming training sessions for 5 km in each session. Blood sampling was done before (two stages) and after (two stages) administration of CoQ10 and pre-cooling. ANCOVA and repeated measurement tests with Bonferroni post hoc test were used for the statistical analysis of the data. There was no significant statistical difference among groups for the levels of CK-MB, cTnI, Mb, LD, TAC, LPO and CoQ10 at the presampling (stages 1 and 2) (P>0·05). However, pre-cooling and control groups show a significant increase in the levels of CK-MB, cTnI, Mb, LD and LPO compared with the supplementation and supplementation with pre-cooling groups in the post-sampling (stages 1 and 2) (P<0·05), except for the TAC and CoQ10. Consequently, CoQ10 supplementation prevents adverse changes of myocardial damage and oxidative stress during swimming competition phase. Meanwhile, the pre-cooling strategy individually has no desired effect on the levels of CK-MB, cTnI, Mb, LD, LPO, TAC and CoQ10.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The effect of short-term coenzyme Q10 supplementation and pre-cooling strategy on cardiac damage markers in elite swimmers
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The effect of short-term coenzyme Q10 supplementation and pre-cooling strategy on cardiac damage markers in elite swimmers
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The effect of short-term coenzyme Q10 supplementation and pre-cooling strategy on cardiac damage markers in elite swimmers
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Asghar Tofighi, email a.tofighi@urmia.ac.ir

References

Hide All
1. Wendt, D, van Loon, LJ & Lichtenbelt, WD (2007) Thermoregulation during exercise in the heat: strategies for maintaining health and performance. Sports Med 37, 669682.
2. Hall, DM, Buettner, GR, Oberley, LW, et al. (2001) Mechanisms of circulatory and intestinal barrier dysfunction during whole body hyperthermia. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 280, H509H521.
3. Bongers, CC, Thijssen, DH, Veltmeijer, MT, et al. (2014) Precooling and percooling (cooling during exercise) both improve performance in the heat: a meta-analytical review. Br J Sports Med 49, 377384.
4. Jones, PR, Barton, C, Morrissey, D, et al. (2012) Pre-cooling for endurance exercise performance in the heat: a systematic review. BMC Med 10, 166.
5. Hasegawa, H, Takatori, T, Komura, T, et al. (2006) Combined effects of pre-cooling and water ingestion on thermoregulation and physical capacity during exercise in a hot environment. J Sports Sci 24, 39.
6. Rahal, A, Kumar, A, Singh, V, et al. (2014) Oxidative stress, prooxidants, and antioxidants: the interplay. Biomed Res Int 2014, 761264.
7. Burgoyne, JR, Mongue-Din, H, Eaton, P, et al. (2012) Redox signaling in cardiac physiology and pathology. Circ Res 111, 10911106.
8. Shave, R, Dawson, E, Whyte, G, et al. (2004) Altered cardiac function and minimal cardiac damage during prolonged exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc 36, 10981103.
9. Kemp, M, Donovan, J, Higham, H, et al. (2004) Biochemical markers of myocardial injury. Br J Anaesth 93, 6373.
10. Tauler, P, Ferrer, MD, Romaguera, D, et al. (2008) Antioxidant response and oxidative damage induced by a swimming session: influence of gender. J Sports Sci 26, 13031311.
11. Santos-Silva, A, Rebelo, MI, Castro, EM, et al. (2001) Leukocyte activation, erythrocyte damage, lipid profile and oxidative stress imposed by high competition physical exercise in adolescents. Clin Chim Acta 306, 119126.
12. Díaz-Castro, J, Guisado, R, Kajarabille, N, et al. (2012) Coenzyme Q10 supplementation ameliorates inflammatory signaling and oxidative stress associated with strenuous exercise. Eur J Nutr 51, 791799.
13. Borekova, M, Hojerova, J, Koprda, V, et al. (2008) Nourishing and health benefits of coenzyme Q10 – a review. Czech J Food Sci 26, 229241.
14. Faul, F, Erdfelder, E, Buchner, A, et al. (2009) Statistical power analyses using G* Power 3.1: tests for correlation and regression analyses. Behav Res Methods 41, 11491160.
15. Swisher, AK, Yeater, R, Moffett, K, et al. (2003) A comparison of methods to determine body fat in individuals with cystic fibrosis: a pilot study. J Exerc Physiol Online 6, 105113.
16. Heyward, VH & Gibson, A (2014) Advanced Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription, 7th ed. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
17. Miles, MV (2007) The uptake and distribution of coenzyme Q(10). Mitochondrion 7, S72S77.
18. Leelarungrayub, D, Sawattikanon, N, Klaphajone, J, et al. (2010) Coenzyme Q10 supplementation decreases oxidative stress and improves physical performance in young swimmers: a pilot study. Open Sports Med J 4, 1–8.
19. Mahan, LK, Escott-Stump, S & Raymond, JL (2012) Krause’s Food & The Nutrition Care Process. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Health Sciences.
20. Tyler, CJ, Sunderland, C & Cheung, SS (2015) The effect of cooling prior to and during exercise on exercise performance and capacity in the heat: a meta-analysis. Br J Sports Med 49, 713.
21. Arngrimsson, SA, Petitt, DS, Stueck, MG, et al. (2004) Cooling vest worn during active warm-up improves 5-km run performance in the heat. J Appl Physiol (1985) 96, 18671874.
22. Booth, J, Wilsmore, B, Macdonald, A, et al. (2001) Whole-body pre-cooling does not alter human muscle metabolism during sub-maximal exercise in the heat. Eur J Appl Physiol 84, 587590.
23. Ross, M, Abbiss, C, Laursen, P, et al. (2013) Precooling methods and their effects on athletic performance. Sports Med 43, 207225.
24. Riewald, S & Rodeo, S (2015) Science of Swimming Faster. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
25. Graves, S, Sikorska, M, Borowy-Borowski, H, et al. (1998) Analysis of coenzyme Q10 content in human plasma and other biological samples. In Free Radical and Antioxidant Protocols, pp. 353–365 [D Armstrong, editor]. Totowa, NJ: Humana Press Inc.
26. Sag, CM, Köhler, AC, Anderson, ME, et al. (2011) CaMKII-dependent SR Ca leak contributes to doxorubicin-induced impaired Ca handling in isolated cardiac myocytes. J Mol Cell Cardiol 51, 749759.
27. König, D, Schumacher, YO, Heinrich, L, et al. (2003) Myocardial stress after competitive exercise in professional road cyclists. Med Sci Sports Exerc 35, 16791683.
28. Clarkson, PM, Kearns, AK, Rouzier, P, et al. (2006) Serum creatine kinase levels and renal function measures in exertional muscle damage. Med Sci Sports Exerc 38, 623627.
29. Bonakdar, RA & Guarneri, E (2005) Coenzyme Q10 . Am Fam Physician 72, 10651070.
30. Petrofsky, J, Laymon, M, Lee, H, et al. (2012) The effect of coenzyme Q10 on endothelial function in a young population. Phys Ther Rehabil Sci 1, 612.
31. Kon, M, Tanabe, K, Akimoto, T, et al. (2008) Reducing exercise-induced muscular injury in kendo athletes with supplementation of coenzyme Q10 . Br J Nutr 100, 903909.
32. Sohal, RS, Kamzalov, S, Sumien, N, et al. (2006) Effect of coenzyme Q10 intake on endogenous coenzyme Q content, mitochondrial electron transport chain, antioxidative defenses, and life span of mice. Free Radic Biol Med 40, 480487.
33. Bloomer, RJ, Canale, RE, McCarthy, CG, et al. (2012) Impact of oral ubiquinol on blood oxidative stress and exercise performance. Oxid Med Cell Longev 2012, 465020.
34. Östman, B, Sjödin, A, Michaëlsson, K, et al. (2012) Coenzyme Q10 supplementation and exercise-induced oxidative stress in humans. Nutrition 28, 403417.
35. Gul, I, Gokbel, H, Belviranli, M, et al. (2011) Oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in plasma after repeated bouts of supramaximal exercise: the effect of coenzyme Q10 . J Sports Med Phys Fitness 51, 305312.
36. Tsai, KL, Chen, LH, Chiou, SH, et al. (2011) Coenzyme Q10 suppresses oxLDL-induced endothelial oxidative injuries by the modulation of LOX-1-mediated ROS generation via the AMPK/PKC/NADPH oxidase signaling pathway. Mol Nutr Food Res 55, Suppl. 2, S227S240.
37. Zheng, A & Moritani, T (2008) Influence of CoQ10 on autonomic nervous activity and energy metabolism during exercise in healthy subjects. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo) 54, 286290.
38. Kamga, C, Krishnamurthy, S & Shiva, S (2012) Myoglobin and mitochondria: a relationship bound by oxygen and nitric oxide. Nitric Oxide 26, 251258.
39. Echtay, KS, Winkler, E, Frischmuth, K, et al. (2001) Uncoupling proteins 2 and 3 are highly active H+ transporters and highly nucleotide sensitive when activated by coenzyme Q (ubiquinone). Proc Natl Acad Sci 98, 14161421.
40. Hue, O, Monjo, R, Lazzaro, M, et al. (2013) The effect of time of day on cold water ingestion by high-level swimmers in a tropical climate. Int J Sports Physiol Perform 8, 442451.
41. Marsh, D & Sleivert, G (1999) Effect of precooling on high intensity cycling performance. Br J Sports Med 33, 393397.
42. Alva, N, Palomeque, J & Carbonell, T (2013) Oxidative stress and antioxidant activity in hypothermia and rewarming: can RONS modulate the beneficial effects of therapeutic hypothermia? Oxid Med Cell Longev 2013, 957054.

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

The effect of short-term coenzyme Q10 supplementation and pre-cooling strategy on cardiac damage markers in elite swimmers

  • Ali Emami (a1), Asghar Tofighi (a1), Siamak Asri-Rezaei (a2) and Behnaz Bazargani-Gilani (a3)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.