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Hypocholesterolaemic effect of banana (Musa sapientum L. var. Cavendishii) pulp in the rat fed on a cholesterol-containing diet

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

T. Horigome
Affiliation:
College of Agriculture, Okayama University, Tsushima, Okayama 700, Japan
E. Sakaguchi
Affiliation:
College of Agriculture, Okayama University, Tsushima, Okayama 700, Japan
C. Kishimoto
Affiliation:
College of Agriculture, Okayama University, Tsushima, Okayama 700, Japan
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Abstract

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The pulp of banana fruit (Musa sapientum L. var. Cavendishii) was examined for its cholesterol-lowering effect with male rats fed on a diet containing lard (50 g/kg) and cholesterol (5 g/kg). Freeze-dried banana pulp showed a marked cholesterol-lowering effect when incorporated into a diet at the level of 300 or 500 g/kg, while the banana pulp dried in a hot-air current (65°) did not. Starch and tannin prepared from banana pulp were not responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effect. The results also suggest that banana lipids did not affect the concentration of serum cholesterol. Feeding of dopamine, n-epinephrine and serotonin tended to raise the concentration of serum cholesterol. Thus, all the substances tested which were thought to be susceptible to influence by hot-air drying were unlikely to be responsible for the hypocholesterolaemic effect. However, both soluble and insoluble fibres fractionated from banana pulp had a cholesterol-lowering effect, with the exception of cellulose. It was assumed that a browning reaction undergone during hot-air drying might be related to the disappearance of the hypocholesterolaemic effect of banana pulp dried in a hot-air current. The results obtained support the conclusion that soluble and insoluble components of dietary fibre participate in the hypocholesterolaemic effect of banana pulp.

Type
Effects of Carbohydrates on Lipid Metabolism
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1992

References

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Hypocholesterolaemic effect of banana (Musa sapientum L. var. Cavendishii) pulp in the rat fed on a cholesterol-containing diet
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