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Oxyphytosterols are present in plasma of healthy human subjects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

André Grandgirard*
Affiliation:
Unité de Nutrition Lipidique, INRA, 17 rue Sully, BP 86510, 21065, DIJON cedex, France
Lucy Martine
Affiliation:
Unité de Nutrition Lipidique, INRA, 17 rue Sully, BP 86510, 21065, DIJON cedex, France
Luc Demaison
Affiliation:
Unité de Nutrition Lipidique, INRA, 17 rue Sully, BP 86510, 21065, DIJON cedex, France
Catherine Cordelet
Affiliation:
Unité de Nutrition Lipidique, INRA, 17 rue Sully, BP 86510, 21065, DIJON cedex, France
Corinne Joffre
Affiliation:
Unité de Nutrition Lipidique, INRA, 17 rue Sully, BP 86510, 21065, DIJON cedex, France
Olivier Berdeaux
Affiliation:
Unité de Nutrition Lipidique, INRA, 17 rue Sully, BP 86510, 21065, DIJON cedex, France
Etienne Semon
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Recherches sur les Arômes, INRA, Dijon, France
*
*Corresponding author: Dr André Grandgirard, fax +33 3 80 69 32 23, email grandgi@dijon.inra.fr
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Abstract

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The oxidised derivatives of phytosterols (oxyphytosterols) were identified in plasma samples from thirteen healthy human volunteers, using MS. All the samples contained noticeable quantities of (24R)-5β,6β-epoxy-24-ethylcholestan-3β-ol (β-epoxysitostanol) and (24R)-ethylcholestan-3β,5α,6β-triol (sitostanetriol) and also trace levels of (24R)-5α,6α-epoxy-24-ethylcholestan-3β-ol (α-epoxysitostanol), (24R)-methylcholestan-3β,5α,6β-triol (campestanetriol) and (24R)-ethylch olest-5-en-3β-ol-7-one(7-ketositosterol). The amounts of these oxyphytosterols in plasma varied from 4·8 to 57·2 ng/ml. There are two possibilities concerning the origin of these compounds. First, they could come from the small amounts of oxyphytosterols in food. Second, they could originate from the in vivo oxidation of phytosterols in plasma. Very few data actually exist concerning these compounds. Their identification in human samples suggests that further research is necessary in this field.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 2004

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