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The piglet as a model for studying dietary components in infant diets: effects of galacto-oligosaccharides on intestinal functions

  • A. Alizadeh (a1) (a2), P. Akbari (a1) (a2), E. Difilippo (a3), H. A. Schols (a3), L. H. Ulfman (a4), M. H. C. Schoterman (a4), J. Garssen (a2) (a5), J. Fink-Gremmels (a1) and S. Braber (a1)...

Abstract

Prebiotic oligosaccharides, including galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), are used in infant formula to mimic human milk oligosaccharides, which are known to have an important role in the development of the intestinal microbiota and the immune system in neonates. The maturation of the intestines in piglets closely resembles that of human neonates and infants. Hence, a neonatal piglet model was used to study the multi-faceted effect of dietary GOS in early life. Naturally farrowed piglets were separated from the mother sow 24–48 h postpartum and received a milk replacer with or without the addition of GOS for 3 or 26 d, whereafter several indicators of intestinal colonisation and maturation were measured. Dietary GOS was readily fermented in the colon, leading to a decreased pH, an increase in butyric acid in caecum digesta and an increase in lactobacilli and bifidobacteria numbers at day 26. Histomorphological changes were observed in the intestines of piglets fed a GOS diet for 3 or 26 d. In turn, differences in the intestinal disaccharidase activity were observed between control and GOS-fed piglets. The mRNA expression of various tight junction proteins was up-regulated in the intestines of piglet fed a GOS diet and was not accompanied by an increase in protein expression. GOS also increased defensin porcine β-defensin-2 in the colon and secretory IgA levels in saliva. In conclusion, by applying a neonatal piglet model, it could be demonstrated that a GOS-supplemented milk replacer promotes the balance of the developing intestinal microbiota, improves the intestinal architecture and seems to stimulate the intestinal defence mechanism.

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Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Dr S. Braber, fax +31 30 2535700, email S.Braber@uu.nl

References

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The piglet as a model for studying dietary components in infant diets: effects of galacto-oligosaccharides on intestinal functions

  • A. Alizadeh (a1) (a2), P. Akbari (a1) (a2), E. Difilippo (a3), H. A. Schols (a3), L. H. Ulfman (a4), M. H. C. Schoterman (a4), J. Garssen (a2) (a5), J. Fink-Gremmels (a1) and S. Braber (a1)...

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