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Processing of oats and the impact of processing operations on nutrition and health benefits

  • Eric A. Decker (a1) (a2), Devin J. Rose (a3) and Derek Stewart (a4) (a5)

Abstract

Oats are a uniquely nutritious food as they contain an excellent lipid profile and high amounts of soluble fibre. However, an oat kernel is largely non-digestible and thus must be utilised in milled form to reap its nutritional benefits. Milling is made up of numerous steps, the most important being dehulling to expose the digestible groat, heat processing to inactivate enzymes that cause rancidity, and cutting, rolling or grinding to convert the groat into a product that can be used directly in oatmeal or can be used as a food ingredient in products such as bread, ready-to-eat breakfast cereals and snack bars. Oats can also be processed into oat bran and fibre to obtain high-fibre-containing fractions that can be used in a variety of food products.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: E. A. Decker, fax +1 413 545 1262, email edecker@foodsci.umass.edu

References

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Keywords

Processing of oats and the impact of processing operations on nutrition and health benefits

  • Eric A. Decker (a1) (a2), Devin J. Rose (a3) and Derek Stewart (a4) (a5)

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