Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Studies with low micromolar levels of ascorbic and dehydroascorbic acid fail to unravel a preferential route for vitamin C uptake and accumulation in U937 cells

  • Catia Azzolini (a1), Mara Fiorani (a1), Andrea Guidarelli (a1) and Orazio Cantoni (a1)
Abstract

Mammalian cells accumulate vitamin C either as ascorbic acid (AA), via Na+–AA co-transport, or dehydroascorbic acid (DHA, the oxidation product of AA), via facilitative hexose transport. As the latter, unlike the former, is a high-capacity transport mechanism, cultured cells normally accumulate greater levels of vitamin C when exposed to increasing concentrations of DHA as compared with AA. We report herein similar results using the U937 cell clone used in our laboratory only under conditions in which DHA and AA are used at concentrations greater than 50–60 μm. Below 60 μm, i.e. at levels in which AA is normally found in most biological fluids, AA and DHA are in fact taken up with identical rates and kinetics. Consequently, extracellular oxidation of AA switches the mode of uptake with hardly any effect on the net amount of vitamin C accumulated. As a final note, under these conditions, neither AA nor DHA causes detectable toxicity or any change in the redox status of the cells, as assessed by the reduced glutathione/reduced pyridine nucleotide pool. These findings therefore imply that some cell types do not have a preferential route for vitamin C accumulation, and that the uptake mechanism is uniquely dependent on the extracellular availability of AA v. DHA.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Studies with low micromolar levels of ascorbic and dehydroascorbic acid fail to unravel a preferential route for vitamin C uptake and accumulation in U937 cells
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Studies with low micromolar levels of ascorbic and dehydroascorbic acid fail to unravel a preferential route for vitamin C uptake and accumulation in U937 cells
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Studies with low micromolar levels of ascorbic and dehydroascorbic acid fail to unravel a preferential route for vitamin C uptake and accumulation in U937 cells
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr M. Fiorani, fax +39 722 305324, email mara.fiorani@uniurb.it
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

1 RC Rose (1987) Solubility properties of reduced and oxidized ascorbate as determinants of membrane permeation. Biochim Biophys Acta 924, 254256.

2 R Daruwala , J Song , WS Koh , (1999) Cloning and functional characterization of the human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters hSVCT1 and hSVCT2. FEBS Lett 460, 480484.

3 WJ Liang , D Johnson & SM Jarvis (2001) Vitamin C transport systems of mammalian cells. Mol Membr Biol 18, 8795.

5 H Wang , B Dutta , W Huang , (1999) Human Na(+)-dependent vitamin C transporter 1 (hSVCT1): primary structure, functional characteristics and evidence for a non-functional splice variant. Biochim Biophys Acta 1461, 19.

8 A Corti , AF Casini & A Pompella (2010) Cellular pathways for transport and efflux of ascorbate and dehydroascorbate. Arch Biochem Biophys 500, 107115.

9 JX Wilson (2005) Regulation of vitamin C transport. Annu Rev Nutr 25, 105125.

14 A Astuya , T Caprile , M Castro , (2005) Vitamin C uptake and recycling among normal and tumor cells from the central nervous system. J Neurosci Res 79, 146156.

17 SC Rumsey , O Kwon , GW Xu , (1997) Glucose transporter isoforms GLUT1 and GLUT3 transport dehydroascorbic acid. J Biol Chem 272, 1898218989.

19 A Montel-Hagen , S Kinet , N Manel , (2008) Erythrocyte Glut1 triggers dehydroascorbic acid uptake in mammals unable to synthesize vitamin C. Cell 132, 10391048.

20 A Montel-Hagen , M Sitbon & N Taylor (2009) Erythroid glucose transporters. Curr Opin Hematol 16, 165172.

23 Q Chen , MG Espey , AY Sun , (2007) Ascorbate in pharmacologic concentrations selectively generates ascorbate radical and hydrogen peroxide in extracellular fluid in vivo. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104, 87498754.

29 JM May , S Mendiratta , ZC Qu , (1999) Vitamin C recycling and function in human monocytic U-937 cells. Free Radic Biol Med 26, 15131523.

31 H Laggner & H Goldenberg (2000) Interaction of respiratory burst and uptake of dehydroascorbic acid in differentiated HL-60 cells. Biochem J 345, 195200.

33 B Frei , L England & BN Ames (1989) Ascorbate is an outstanding antioxidant in human blood plasma. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 86, 63776381.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 3
Total number of PDF views: 24 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 50 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 1st May 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.