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The tissue profile of metabolically active coenzyme forms of vitamin B12 differs in vitamin B12-depleted rats treated with hydroxo-B12 or cyano-B12

  • Eva Greibe (a1), Linda S. Kornerup (a1), Christian B. Juul (a2), Sergey N. Fedosov (a2), Christian W. Heegaard (a2) and Ebba Nexo (a1)...
Abstract

Recent rat studies show different tissue distributions of vitamin B12 (B12), administered orally as hydroxo-B12 (HO-B12) (predominant in food) and cyano-B12 (CN-B12) (common in supplements). Here we examine male Wistar rats kept on a low-B12 diet for 4 weeks followed by a 2-week period on diets with HO-B12 (n 9) or CN-B12 (n 9), or maintained on a low-B12 diet (n 9). Plasma B12 was analysed before, during and after the study. The content of B12 and its variants (HO-B12, glutathionyl-B12, CN-B12, 5'-deoxyadenosyl-B12 (ADO-B12), and methyl-B12 (CH3-B12)) were assessed in the tissues at the end of the study. A period of 4 weeks on the low-B12 diet reduced plasma B12 by 58 % (from median 1323 (range 602–1791) to 562 (range 267–865) pmol/l, n 27). After 2 weeks on a high-B12 diet (week 6 v. week 4), plasma B12 increased by 68 % (HO-B12) and 131 % (CN-B12). Total B12 in the tissues accumulated differently: HO-B12>CN-B12 (liver, spleen), HO-B12<CN-B12 (kidneys), and HO-B12≈CN-B12 (brain, heart). Notably, more than half of the administered CN-B12 remained in this form in the kidneys, whereas HO-B12 was largely converted to the bioactive ADO-B12. Only <10 % of the other cofactor, CH3-B12, were found in the tissues. In conclusion, dietary CN-B12 caused a higher increase in plasma and total kidney B12 but provided less than half of the active coenzymes in comparison to dietary HO-B12. These data argue that HO-B12 may provide a better tissue supply of B12 than CN-B12, thereby underscoring the lack of a direct relation between plasma B12 and tissue B12.

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      The tissue profile of metabolically active coenzyme forms of vitamin B12 differs in vitamin B12-depleted rats treated with hydroxo-B12 or cyano-B12
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      The tissue profile of metabolically active coenzyme forms of vitamin B12 differs in vitamin B12-depleted rats treated with hydroxo-B12 or cyano-B12
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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
* Corresponding author: E. Greibe, email greibe@clin.au.dk
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