Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Use of pedometers to measure the relationship of dog walking to body condition score in obese and non-obese dogs

  • Barbour S. Warren (a1), Joseph J. Wakshlag (a2), Mary Maley (a1), Tracy J. Farrell (a1), Angela M. Struble (a2), Matthew R. Panasevich (a2) and Martin T. Wells (a3)...

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to utilise an accurate canine pedometer methodology and to assess the relationship between activity and body condition score (BCS) in dogs. Initial methodology validation used videography and pedometer step measurements to assess actual steps taken in comparison with pedometer readings for twenty large, medium and small dogs. During the validation, dogs considered to be medium or large breed showed no significant difference between pedometer readings and actual steps taken. A total of seventy-seven obese and non-obese dogs over 35 cm (14 inches) shoulder height and over 10 kg were recruited from a dog obesity clinic and a community sample to assess daily walking activity. Body condition scoring and pedometer steps were assessed on three separate weeks during a 10-week period. During the activity monitoring, daily step counts ranged from 5555 to 39 970 steps/d among the seventy-seven medium and large dogs. Dogs’ BCS were inversely correlated with average daily steps (Spearman's ρ = − 0·442, P < 0·0001). The present study identified a significant inverse correlation between daily walking steps and BCS over a range from 4 to 9 out of 9 (P < 0·0001).

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Use of pedometers to measure the relationship of dog walking to body condition score in obese and non-obese dogs
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Use of pedometers to measure the relationship of dog walking to body condition score in obese and non-obese dogs
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Use of pedometers to measure the relationship of dog walking to body condition score in obese and non-obese dogs
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr J. J. Wakshlag, fax +1 607 253 4389, email jw37@cornell.edu

References

Hide All
1Wolin, KY, Carson, K & Colditz, GA (2010) Obesity and cancer. Oncologist 15, 556565.
2German, AJ (2006) The growing problem of obesity in dogs and cats. J Nutr 136, 1940S1946S.
3Kealy, RD, Lawler, DF, Ballam, JM, et al. (2002) Effects of diet restriction on life span and age-related changes in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 220, 13151320.
4Yaissle, JE, Holloway, C & Buffington, CA (2004) Evaluation of owner education as a component of obesity treatment programs for dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 224, 19321935.
5Roudebush, P, Schoenherr, WD & Delaney, SJ (2008) An evidence-based review of the use of therapeutic foods, owner education, exercise, and drugs for the management of obese and overweight pets. J Am Vet Med Assoc 233, 717725.
6Laflamme, DP (2006) Understanding and managing obesity in dogs and cats. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 36, 12831295.
7Corder, K, Brage, S & Ekelund, U (2007) Accelerometers and pedometers: methodology and clinical application. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 10, 597603.
8Westerterp, KR (1999) Physical activity assessment with accelerometers. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 23, S45S49.
9Dow, C, Michel, KE, Love, M, et al. (2009) Evaluation of optimal sampling interval for activity monitoring in companion dogs. Am J Vet Res 70, 244248.
10Holland, JL, Kronfeld, DS & Meacham, TN (1996) Behavior of horses is affected by soy lecithin and corn oil in the diet. J Anim Sci 74, 12521255.
11Hocking, PM, Bernard, R & Maxwell, MH (1999) Assessment of pain during locomotion and the welfare of adult male turkeys with destructive cartilege loss of the hip joint. Br Poult Sci 40, 3034.
12Chan, CB, Spierenburg, M, Ihle, SL, et al. (2005) Use of pedometers to measure physical activity in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 226, 20102015.
13Roelofs, JB, van Eerdenburg, FJ, Soede, NM, et al. (2005) Pedometer readings for estrous detection and as predictor for time of ovulation in dairy cattle. Theriogenology 64, 16901703.
14Mazrier, H, Tal, S, Aizinbud, E, et al. (2006) A field investigation of the use of the pedometer for the early detection of lameness in cattle. Can Vet J 47, 883886.
15Laflamme, DP, Kuhlman, G & Lawler, DF (1997) Evaluation of weight loss protocols for dogs. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 33, 253259.
16Mawby, DI, Bartges, JW, d'Avignon, A, et al. (2004) Comparison of various methods for estimating body fat in dogs. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 40, 109114.
17Bravata, DM, Smith-Spangler, C, Sundaram, V, et al. (2007) Using pedometers to increase physical activity and improve health: a systematic review. J Am Med Assoc 298, 22962304.
18Lopez, AM, Alvarez, D, Gonzalez, RC, et al. (2008) Validity of four gait models to estimate walked distance from vertical COG acceleration. J Appl Biomech 24, 360367.
19Wakshlag, JJ, Struble, AM, Warren, BS, et al. (2010) Increased physical activity allows for greater kilocalorie consumption during a weight loss protocol. J Am Vet Med Assoc (Accepted for Publication November, 2010).

Keywords

Use of pedometers to measure the relationship of dog walking to body condition score in obese and non-obese dogs

  • Barbour S. Warren (a1), Joseph J. Wakshlag (a2), Mary Maley (a1), Tracy J. Farrell (a1), Angela M. Struble (a2), Matthew R. Panasevich (a2) and Martin T. Wells (a3)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed