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Alzheimer’s Disease: Errors in Gene Expression

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2015

D.R. Crapper McLachlan*
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology and Medicine and the Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto
P.N. Lewis*
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology and Medicine and the Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto
*
Department of Physiology, Medical Sciences Building, University of Toronto. Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A8
Department of Physiology, Medical Sciences Building, University of Toronto. Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A8
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Hypotheses concerning the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease are numerous but perhaps two of the most probable involve either an unconventional infectious agent of the scrapie, Creutzfeldt-Jakob family or an error in gene expression. Strong circumstantial evidence supports both hypotheses; however, definitive evidence will require an extensive understanding of the molecular biology of this common cause of senile and presenile dementia.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation 1985

References

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