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Neuropathology in Canada: Overview of Development and Current Status

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 December 2014

Marc R. Del Bigio
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Edward S. Johnson
Affiliation:
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

Background:

The expansion of neurosurgery and neurology in Montreal and Toronto in the early 20th century was the stimulus for the development of neuropathology in Canada. Rooted in the disciplines of the neurosciences and laboratory medicine, neuropathology evolved into an independent discipline with the founding of the Canadian Association of Neuropathologists in 1960, and the recognition as a specialty by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in Canada in 1965, fostering the development of several successful training programs. Nonetheless, a paucity of data remains concerning the background of training, scopes of practice, and career paths.

Method:

We conducted a survey of all physicians in Canada who have either practiced neuropathology or undergone relevant training.

Results:

In 2009, 53 physicians were engaged in the practice of neuropathology, either exclusively or a substantial proportion of their time. Most work in tertiary hospitals, but a few service non-academic medical centers. Three routes of training were identified: direct from medical school (often with relevant research training), indirect from another clinical neuroscience specialty, and following or in conjunction with certification in one of the other pathology specialties. Practice profiles differ slightly, and some of the neuropathologists entering from pathology have mixed anatomical pathology/neuropathology responsibilities. Many of those with prior exposure in the neurosciences are more productive with regard to research and publications.

Conclusions:

Existing multiple options for neuropathology training have facilitated recruitment and allowed development of a mosaic of specialists able to fulfill the diversity of needs in Canadian medical and scientific communities.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Canadian Journal of Neurological 2010

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