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Relationship Between Sleep, Neck Muscle Activity, and Pain in Cervical Dystonia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2015

Frank Lobbezoo
Affiliation:
Centre d’étude du sommeil, Département de psychiatrie, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur
Marc Thu Thon
Affiliation:
Centre de recherche en sciences neurologiques, Département de physiologic Faculté de médecine et de médecine dentaire, Université de Montréal
Guy Rémillard
Affiliation:
Département de neurologie, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur (G.R.), Montréal, Québec
Jacques Y. Montplaisir
Affiliation:
Centre d’étude du sommeil, Département de psychiatrie, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur
Gilles J. Lavigne*
Affiliation:
Centre d’étude du sommeil, Département de psychiatrie, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur
*
Centre d’étude du sommeil, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur, 5400 boul. Gouin Ouest, Montréal, Québec, Canada H4J 1C5
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Abstract

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Objective: The interactions between sleep, neck muscle activity, and cervical spinal pain were examined in a controlled study with nine patients suffering from idiopathic cervical dystonia (ICD; also referred to as spasmodic torticollis), and nine gender- and age-matched controls. Methods: From each participant, two all-night polysomnograms with additional electromyographic recordings from the sternocleidomastoid and upper trapezius muscles were obtained. The first night was for habituation to the laboratory environment; the second night for experimental data collection. Visual analogue scales were used to collect intensity and unpleasantness ratings of cervical spinal pain before and after the second sleep recording. Results: None of the standard sleep variables showed statistically significant differences between average values of both groups of participants. However, a significantly larger variance in sleep latency was obtained for the ICD patients. In general, abnormal cervical muscle activity decreased immediately when lying down without the intention to go to sleep. Subsequently, abnormal muscle contractions were gradually abolished in all ICD patients during the transition from relaxed wakefulness to light NREM sleep. Following this transition phase, no more abnormal EMG activity was found in any of our patients. Finally, cervical spinal pain intensity and unpleasantness were reduced by about 50% overnight. Conclusions: Both supine position and sleep can be associated with an improvement of symptoms of ICD, and this disorder does not induce any sleep perturbations.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation 1996

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