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A Rostrocaudal Gradient for Aromatic Acid Decarboxylase in the Human Striatum

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2016

E.S. Garnett
Affiliation:
Department of Nuclear Medicine, McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton and the Movement Disorder Clinic, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto (Dr. Lang)
A.E. Lang
Affiliation:
Department of Nuclear Medicine, McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton and the Movement Disorder Clinic, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto (Dr. Lang)
R. Chirakal
Affiliation:
Department of Nuclear Medicine, McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton and the Movement Disorder Clinic, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto (Dr. Lang)
G. Firnau
Affiliation:
Department of Nuclear Medicine, McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton and the Movement Disorder Clinic, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto (Dr. Lang)
C. Nahmias
Affiliation:
Department of Nuclear Medicine, McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton and the Movement Disorder Clinic, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto (Dr. Lang)
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Abstract:

The local concentration of 6-[18F]fluoro-L-dopa (18F) reflects the activity of aromatic acid decarboxylase (AADC), the enzyme that generates dopamine from its precursor amino acid, L-dopa. In young healthy adults, the local concentration of 18F, and hence AADC activity, is constant in coronal slices taken in a rostrocaudal direction. With increasing age a gradient representing decreasing activity in the putamen develops. This decrease is less marked than was expected from the literature. In five children with primary dystonia, the striatal distribution of 18F resembled that seen in the normal older adults. In established clinical Parkinson's disease the rostrocaudal gradient becomes steep; the putamen is more damaged.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation 1987

References

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