Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-vvt5l Total loading time: 0.276 Render date: 2022-06-28T17:06:36.468Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

The Funding of Long-Term Care in Canada: What Do We Know, What Should We Know?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 April 2018

Michel Grignon*
Affiliation:
Department of Economics and Department of Health, Aging & Society, McMaster University
Byron G. Spencer
Affiliation:
Department of Economics, McMaster University
*
La correspondance et les demandes de tirés-à-part doivent être adressées à : / Correspondence and requests for offprints should be sent to: Michel Grignon, Ph.D. Professor, Department of Economics and Department of Health, Aging & Society McMaster University 280 Main Street West Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M4 <grignon@mcmaster.ca>

Abstract

Long-term care is a growing component of health care spending but how much is spent or who bears the cost is uncertain, and the measures vary depending on the source used. We drew on regularly published series and ad hoc publications to compile preferred estimates of the share of long-term care spending in total health care spending, the private share of long-term care spending, and the share of residential care within long-term care. For each series, we compared estimates obtainable from published sources (CIHI [Canadian Institute for Health Information] and OECD [Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development]) with our preferred estimates. We conclude that using published series without adjustment would lead to spurious conclusions on the level and evolution of spending on long-term care in Canada as well as on the distribution of costs between private and public funders and between residential and home care.

Résumé

Les dépenses liées à la perte d’autonomie en soins de longue durée représentent une part croissante des dépenses en soins de santé, mais il n’est pas facile d’en appréhender le montant total ou bien la source de financement en se fondant sur les données publiées. Nous utilisons des séries de statistiques publiées régulièrement ainsi que des publications occasionnelles pour colliger des estimations validées de la part occupée par les dépenses en soins de longue durée relativement aux dépenses totales en soins de santé, ainsi que celle des dépenses en soins de longue durée financés de manière privée comparativement à celle des soins fournis en institution. Pour chaque série de statistiques, nous comparons les estimations publiées (par l’ICIS ou l’OCDE) à notre estimation validée. Notre conclusion est que l’utilisation de statistiques publiées régulièrement sans ajustement pourrait conduire à des interprétations erronées sur le niveau et l’évolution des dépenses en soins de longue durée au Canada, ainsi que sur la distribution de ces dépenses entre les secteurs privé et public ou bien entre les soins institutionnels et les soins à domicile.

Type
Article
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association on Gerontology 2018 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

*

We are grateful to Simon Webb for excellent assistance in the preparation of the report on which this article is based, and which was presented at a meeting organized by Health Canada. We are grateful also to Health Canada for the financial support of the work reported here.

References

Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2007). Public sector expenditures and utilization of home care services in Canada: Exploring the data. Ottawa, ON: Author.Google Scholar
Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2009). Analysis in brief: Alternative level of care in Canada. Ottawa, ON: Author.Google Scholar
Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2013). National health expenditure trends, 1975 to 2013. Ottawa, ON: Author.Google Scholar
Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2017). Series_c_nhex 2017.xlsx, Table C.2.4 Private-sector health expenditure by use of funds in current dollars as a proportion of total, Canada, 1975 to 2017 Access data and reports. Retrieved from https://www.cihi.ca/en/access-data-and-reports (select “health spending”)Google Scholar
Canadian Life and Health Insurance Association. (2012). CLHIA report on long-term care policy: Improving the accessibility, quality, and sustainability of long-term care in Canada. Toronto, ON: Author.Google Scholar
Coyte, P. (2000). Home care in Canada: Passing the buck. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto.Google Scholar
Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2000). A system of health accounts. Paris, FRA: Author.Google Scholar
Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2011). Help wanted? Providing and paying for long-term care. Paris, FRA: Author.Google Scholar
Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2013). OECD economic policy papers 6: Public spending on health and long-term care: A new set of projections. Paris, FRA: Author.Google Scholar
Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2017). OECD health statistics 2017. Retrieved from http://www.oecd.org/health/health-data.htm.Google Scholar
Payne, A. (2012). The 2011 Survey of Canadian Charities: Summary of responses, internal document. Hamilton, ON: Public Economics Data Analysis Laboratory (PEDAL), McMaster University.Google Scholar
United Nations. (1993). System of national accounts 1993. New York, NY: United Nations, Commission of the European Communities, International Monetary Fund, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and World Bank. Retrieved from https://unstats.un.org/unsd/nationalaccount/sna1993.aspGoogle Scholar
Supplementary material: File

Grignon and Spencer supplementary material

Grignon and Spencer supplementary material 1

Download Grignon and Spencer supplementary material(File)
File 211 KB
3
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Funding of Long-Term Care in Canada: What Do We Know, What Should We Know?
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The Funding of Long-Term Care in Canada: What Do We Know, What Should We Know?
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The Funding of Long-Term Care in Canada: What Do We Know, What Should We Know?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *