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Introduction. Dying for Development: Pollution, Illness and the Limits of Citizens' Agency in China*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 May 2013

Anna Lora-Wainwright*
Affiliation:
Oxford University. Email: anna.lora-wainwright@ouce.ox.ac.uk.

Abstract

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Type
Special Section on Dying for Development
Copyright
Copyright © The China Quarterly 2013 

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Footnotes

*

Most of the papers included in this collection were first presented at a symposium hosted in Oxford in March 2011 and organized by the editor. This was made possible by generous funding from the Contemporary China Studies Program (The Leverhulme Trust) and from the British Inter-University China Centre (Arts and Humanities Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, and Higher Education Funding Council for England). In addition to those included in this collection, the author would like to thank the discussants and participants for their helpful comments.

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