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Holocaust Mahnmal (Memorial): Monumental Memory amidst Contemporary Race

  • Damani J. Partridge (a1)
Abstract

This essay examines the relationship between contemporary racialized subjects in Germany and the process of Holocaust memorialization. I ask why youths from these contexts fail to see themselves in the process of Holocaust memorialization, and why that process fails to see them in it. My argument is not about equivalences, but instead I examine the ways in which the monumentalization of Holocaust memory has inadvertently worked to exclude both relevant subjects and potential participants from the process of memorialization. That process as a monumental enterprise has also worked to sever connections between racialist memory and contemporary racism. The monumental display of what presents itself, at times, as moral superiority does not adequately attend to the everyday, mundane, repeatable qualities of racialized exclusion today, or in the past.

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Corresponding author
djpartri@umich.edu
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Leslie Adelson . 2005. The Turkish Turn in Contemporary German Literature: Towards a New Critical Grammar of Migration. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Dominic Boyer . 2005. Welcome to the New Europe. American Ethnologist 32, 4 (Nov.): 521–23.

Matti Bunzl . 2005. Between Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia: Some Thoughts on the New Europe. American Ethnologist 32, 4 (Nov.): 499508.

Rita C.-K. Chin 2009. After the Nazi Racial State: Difference and Democracy in Germany and Europe. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Irit Dekel . 2009. Ways of Looking: Observation and Transformation at the Holocaust Memorial, Berlin. Memory Studies 2, 1: 7186.

Jeffrey Olick . 1998. What Does It Mean to Normalize the Past? Official Memory in German Politics since 1989. Social Science History 22, 4 (Special Issue: “Memory and the Nation”): 547–71.

Damani Partridge . 2008. We Were Dancing in the Club, Not on the Berlin Wall: Black Bodies, Street Bureaucrats, and Exclusionary Incorporation into the New Europe. Cultural Anthropology 23, 4: 660–87.

Gökçe Yurdakul and Y. Michal Bodemann . 2006. “We Don't Want to Be the Jews of Tomorrow”: Jews and Turks in Germany after 9/11. German Politics and Society 24, 2: 4467.

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Comparative Studies in Society and History
  • ISSN: 0010-4175
  • EISSN: 1475-2999
  • URL: /core/journals/comparative-studies-in-society-and-history
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